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I am so so with using Tasks in C# but I get confused when I try to return a Task from a method and that method will do multiple tasks within itself. So do I have my method spin up a new Task and then do everything sequentially inside of there? It's hard to wrap my head around doing it all with .ContinueWith()

Example:

public Task<string> GetSomeData(CancellationToken token)
{
    return Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();

        var initialData = GetSomeInteger(token).Result;

        return GetSomeString(initialData, token).Result;
    });
}

public Task<int> GetSomeInteger(CancellationToken token)
{
    return Task<int>.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        return 4;
    }, token);
}

public Task<string> GetSomeString(int value, CancellationToken token)
{
    return Task<string>.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        return value.ToString();
    }, token);
}

I am unsure how else to write this method to make it use Tasks correctly. I guess I just feel like there should be a .ContinueWith in there or something.

Possible fix??

public Task<string> GetSomeData(CancellationToken token)
{
    return GetSomeInteger(token).ContinueWith((prevTask) =>
    {
        return GetSomeString(prevTask.Result, token);
    }, token).Unwrap();
}
share|improve this question
    
It is difficult to recommend something without having the context. Could you please provide some concrete details about the methods which return Tasks? –  Sergey Brunov Aug 2 '12 at 18:13
1  
Can you show the actual declaration of SomeOtherMethodWhichReturnsTask and MethodWhichAlsoReturnsTask? What you have now is kind of crazy, as it's a method which returns Task<Task<string>>, which I suspect is wrong... –  Reed Copsey Aug 2 '12 at 18:14
    
@Serge I guess if this is the best way to write a method that returns a Task when that method needs to call other methods which also returns a task. I wonder if I need to change those calls to the other methods with .ContinueWith –  Travyguy9 Aug 2 '12 at 18:15
    
@ReedCopsey sure I just wrote that and made up stuff. Didn't think it was needed to know what those other methods were or did. –  Travyguy9 Aug 2 '12 at 18:15
1  
@ReedCopsey I don't think so. I am pretty sure the UnWrap I am using is in .NET 4.0 msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd780917.aspx –  Travyguy9 Aug 2 '12 at 18:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In general, it's often best to try to avoid spinning up new tasks if you are already working with task-based methods. Chaining tasks instead of blocking explicitly will reduce the overhead of the system, as it won't keep a ThreadPool thread tied up waiting.

That being said, it's often simpler to just block as you're doing.

Note that C# 5 makes this far simpler, providing an API that gives you the best of both:

public async Task<string> GetSomeData(CancellationToken token)
{
    token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();

    var initialData = await SomeOtherMethodWhichReturnsTask(token);

    string result = await initialData.MethodWhichAlsoReturnsTask(token);

    return result;
};

Edit after update:

Given the new code, there isn't an easy way to chain this directly with ContinueWith. There are a couple of options. You can use Unwrap to convert the Task<Task<string>> you'd create, ie:

public Task<string> GetSomeData(CancellationToken token)
{
    Task<Task<string>> task = GetSomeInteger(token)
                               .ContinueWith(t => 
                               {
                                   return GetSomeString(t.Result, token);
                               }, token);
    return task.Unwrap();
}

Alternatively, you can handle the unwrapping yourself elegantly with TaskCompletionSource<T>:

public Task<string> GetSomeData(CancellationToken token)
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<string>();

    Task<int> task1 = GetSomeInteger(token);
    Task<Task<string>> task2 = task1.ContinueWith(t => GetSomeString(t.Result, token));
    task2.ContinueWith(t => tcs.SetResult(t.Result.Result));
    return tcs.Task;
}

This allows the entire process to work without creating a new Task (which ties up a threadpool thread), and without ever blocking.

Note that you would probably want to add continuations on cancellation, and use tcs.SetCancelled when a cancellation was requested, as well.

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How would I write it with chaining then? I have a thought but it just feels wrong –  Travyguy9 Aug 2 '12 at 18:23
    
@Travyguy9 I showed one option using your API –  Reed Copsey Aug 2 '12 at 18:29
    
Why don't you just directly return task2? You don't need the TaskCompletionSource there. –  svick Aug 2 '12 at 18:40
    
@svick task2 is Task<Task<string>> since the second method returns Task<string> - I just edited to make it more clear. –  Reed Copsey Aug 2 '12 at 18:43
    
@ReedCopsey You're right, I didn't realize that. –  svick Aug 2 '12 at 18:56

Yes, everything will run sequentially within your main task. This is because calling the Result property will block the current thread until the value has returned.

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I understand that, but SHOULD it run sequentially in there when I call out .Result? Or should I chain it with .ContinueWith and once I have the final result, return that value (.Result) –  Travyguy9 Aug 2 '12 at 18:16
    
You probably should be chaining these tasks together, but this really does depend on whether you use these tasks independently or with other tasks in some other different scenarios. Result definitely should block - this is a no limitation and it should be taken advantage of by developers. Using ContinueWith has a performance benefit as the scheduler will know what thread to execute it. –  davenewza Aug 2 '12 at 18:21

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