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Can anyone tell me how to access variables declared and defined in a function in another function. E.g

void function1()
{
   string abc;
}

void function2()
{
   I want to access abc here.
}

How to do that? I know using parameters we can do that but is there any other way ?

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3  
I suggest you read up on scoping, and you will understand why it's not possible. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 2 '12 at 18:19
    
This simply makes no sense: there is one instance of abc per invocation of function1. In for(int i = 0; i < 100; ++i) { function1(); } which of the one hundred instances of abc do you want? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 2 '12 at 18:21
    
Do you know about static members ? –  phadaphunk Aug 2 '12 at 18:29
    
What do you really want to do? Why are you seeking to do this? As you can see from the answers, there are a number of alternatives available. What you should do is dependent on the specific goal you are trying to achieve. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 2 '12 at 18:31
    
Well I am ignoring parameter method because I am using Qt and there are problems when I use void function1(QString& abc) and it gives me some weird error but if I use void function1(int& abcd) it compiles correctly –  Varun Chitre Aug 2 '12 at 18:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The C++ way is to pass abc by reference to your function:

void function1()
{
    std::string abc;
    function2(abc);
}
void function2(std::string &passed)
{
    passed = "new string";
}

You may also pass your string as a pointer and dereference it in function2. This is more the C-style way of doing things and is not as safe (e.g. a NULL pointer could be passed in, and without good error checking it will cause undefined behavior or crashes.

void function1()
{
    std::string abc;
    function2(&abc);
}
void function2(std::string *passed)
{
    *passed = "new string";
}
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Thank you I will try and let you know :D –  Varun Chitre Aug 2 '12 at 18:59
    
This worked!! :D Thank you! –  Varun Chitre Aug 3 '12 at 7:27

There is absolutely no way. Variables of the block can be directly accessed ONLY from that block.

Pointers/references to the object can be passed into functions that are called from this block as parameters.

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1  
This is, of course, false. Scoping limits the name of an object from being visible in another block. It does not limit access to the object. Access can be obtained by passing references, among other means. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 2 '12 at 18:21
    
@EricPostpischil but references to what? Scoping defines the lifetime of the object too, unless it is static or dynamically allocated. Furthermore OP specified "no parameters". –  juanchopanza Aug 2 '12 at 18:25
    
Put the reference in a global variable. Pass the reference to the other function. Pass the reference to a function that makes it accessible to the other function. Take a pointer as a parameter, and store the reference in the pointed-to location. Etc. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 2 '12 at 18:30
    
@EricPostpischil OP wants to know how to "how to access variables declared and defined in a function..." –  juanchopanza Aug 2 '12 at 18:31
    
@juanchopanza: Yes, so? As I wrote, access can be obtained by a variety of means. Another one is to use the introspection facilities provided by debugging information. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 2 '12 at 18:32

Make it global then both can manipulate it.

string abc;

void function1(){
    abc = "blah";
} 

void function2(){
    abc = "hello";
} 
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1  
I was going to suggest this, but the OP specifically states, variables declared and defined in a function. –  JoeFish Aug 2 '12 at 18:26
1  
If he is not familiar with variable scope, then it is possible he did not know this way was possible. –  BenN Aug 2 '12 at 18:45
    
Thanks! I will try –  Varun Chitre Aug 2 '12 at 19:01

If you have a variable in function1 that you want to use in function2, then you must either:

  1. pass it directly,
  2. have a higher scope function that calls both declare the variable and pass it, or
  3. declare it a global and then all functions can access it

If your function2 is called from function1, then you can just pass it as an argument to function2.

void function1()  
{  
    std::string abc;  
    function2( abc );  
}  

void function2( std::string &passed )   
{   
    // function1::abc is now aliased as passed and available for general usage.
   cout << passed << " is from function1.";   
}   

If function1 doesn't call function2, but both are called by function3, then have function3 declare the variable and pass it to both function1 and function2 as an argument.

void parentFunction( )
{
    std::string abc;  
    function1( abc );  
    function2( abc );  
}
void function1( std::string &passed )   
{   
   // Parent function's variable abc is now aliased as passed and available for general usage.
   cout << passed << " is from parent function.";   
}   
void function2( std::string &passed )   
{   
    // Parent function's variable abc is now aliased as passed and available for general usage.
   cout << passed << " is from parent function.";   
}    

Finally, if neither function1 nor function2 is called from each other, nor from the same function in code, then declare the variable to be shared as a global, and function1 and function2 will be able to directly use it.

std::string global_abc;  
void function1( )   
{   
   cout << global_abc << " is available everywhere.";   
}   
void function2( )   
{   
   cout << global_abc << " is available everywhere.";   
}    
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