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Is there a way to browse and display files in a git repo without cloning it first? I can do those in svn using the commands:

svn ls /path/to/repo 
svn cat /path/to/repo/file-in-repo

I can supposedly use git show but doing:

git show /path/to/repo
git show HEAD:/path/to/repo

result to

fatal: Not a git repository
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4 Answers 4

up vote 34 down vote accepted

The command you want is git-ls-remote which allows you to get some information about remote repositories, but you cant show history or list directories or anything of that level: essentially it only lets you see the remote objects at a very high-level (you can see the current HEADs and tags for example).

The only real way to do what you want (if I understand correctly) would be to use ssh to run a remote command and return the results, for example:

ssh me@otherhost "cd repo && git log -n 10"

What you want would be lovely functionality if they could add it, but from what I read it's not very easy since getting history etc needs a lot of information to be local to git, and at that point you may as well have done a git fetch.

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Git is distributed version control system, while Subversion is centralized (client-server) version control system. They work differently; get used to that. Please read my answer explaining the consequences of that difference to git equivalent of svn status -u question at StackOverflow.

Repeating myself a bit: in centralized version control system (like CVS or Subversion) almost all commands are processed on server, and involve network. Very few commands are performed locally. Note that to have good performance of "svn status" and "svn diff" Subversion stores 'pristine copy' of checked-out version on client, to not have to involve network transfer for those common operations (this means that Subversion checkout = 2 x size of working directory at least).

In distributed version control system (like Git, Mercurial or Bazaar), where you have local copy (clone) of a whole repository, almost all commands are performed on client. Veery few commands require network connection to other repository (to server).

The number of command you can perform on server is limited.

  • You can list all references on remote with "git ls-remote <URL>".
  • You can get snapshot of (part) of repository (if remote server enabled it) with
    "git archive --remote=<URL> HEAD".
  • You can clone only a few last commits (so called "shallow clone") with
    "git clone --depth=1 <URL>".
  • If server provides git web interface to repository, you can use it to browse.
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13  
As correct as you are, if you are browsing a remote repo without first cloning it, then obviously you have decided that it is ok to forego the offline capabilities of git. Given that, I see no reason to pretend that this wouldn't be a useful feature for some things, for instance, a local client that allows you to browse a the file contents of a remote repo locally. –  LadyCailin Nov 1 '12 at 15:44
    
Agreed, the position that Jakub takes is highly restrictive. It is worth losing reputation more than once to point this out. –  ctpenrose Jul 19 '13 at 0:09
    
I dislike the "get used to that" tone., but when readin until the end I found a solution to my current problem - wating to see what's in 110 repository I have one git, but no ssh or shell access to, and which are all probably quite big, some 12GB or so. So the clone with a minmized depth helps at least to only see recent interesting history. and make the git repo as small as possible. –  Henning Mar 5 at 10:55
    
Such functionality would be nice to have in case of code review tools where you don't need the whole repo just log with changes is enough. –  Lukasz Lenart Mar 21 at 9:09

Sorry to bump, but take a look at http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Internals-Transfer-Protocols for info on how to do this over some transport protocols. Note this won't work for standard git over SSH.

For git over SSH, an up-to-date server-side git should allow you to git-archive directly from the remote, which you could then e.g. pipe to "tar t" to get a list of all files in a given commit.

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13  
Don't be sorry about bumping! New, working answers to old questions are always useful: the old questions aren't necessarily outdated questions. –  Seth Johnson Sep 9 '11 at 21:07

This is probably considered dirty by some, but a very practical solution in case of github repositories is just to make a script, e.g. "git-ls":

#!/bin/sh
remote_url=${1:? "$0 requires URL as argument"}
curl -s $remote_url | grep js-directory-link | sed "s/.* title=\"\(.*\)\".*/\1/"

Make it executable and reachable of course: chmod a+x git-ls; sudo cp git-ls /usr/local/bin. Now, you just run it as you wish:

git-ls https://github.com/mrquincle/aim-bzr
git-ls https://github.com/mrquincle/aim-bzr/tree/master/aim_modules

Also know that there is a git instaweb utility for your local files. To have the ability to show files and have a server like that does in my opinion not destroy any of the inherent decentralized characteristics of git.

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