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i started to use gvim, and i can't understand how does the multiline edit works in gvim, for example: original text:

asd asd asd asd asd;
asd asd asd asd asd;
asd asd asd asd asd;
asd asd asd asd asd;
asd asd asd asd asd;
asd asd asd asd asd;
asd asd asd asd asd;

ctrl+q, jjjjjj , $ everything is selected, then i press I to do a multiline insert.

My intention is to quote like the first line, then i press Esc.

asd "asd asd" asd asd;
asasd asd asd asd asd;
asasd asd asd asd asd;
asasd asd asd asd asd;
asasd asd asd asd asd;
asasd asd asd asd asd;
asasd asd asd asd asd;

What happened? I expect a similar behaviour than sublimetext's. If you don't know how that works, it just repeats the actions for every line. How can achieve that? And what is vim doing here?

share|improve this question
    
Just record a keyboard macro to change the first line and then playback the macro for all the other lines. –  high5 Aug 3 '12 at 3:21

5 Answers 5

Do yourself a favor by droping the Windows compatibility layer. The normal shortcut for entering Visual-Block mode is <C-v>.

Others have dealt with recording macros, here are a few other ideas:

Using only visual-block mode.

  1. Put the cursor on the second word:

    asd |a|sd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    
  2. Hit <C-v> to enter visual-block mode and expand your selection toward the bottom:

    asd [a]sd asd asd asd;
    asd [a]sd asd asd asd;
    asd [a]sd asd asd asd;
    asd [a]sd asd asd asd;
    asd [a]sd asd asd asd;
    asd [a]sd asd asd asd;
    asd [a]sd asd asd asd;
    
  3. Hit I"<Esc> to obtain:

    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    
  4. Put the cursor on the last char of the third word:

    asd "asd as|d| asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    asd "asd asd asd asd;
    
  5. Hit <C-v> to enter visual-block mode and expand your selection toward the bottom:

    asd "asd as[d] asd asd;
    asd "asd as[d] asd asd;
    asd "asd as[d] asd asd;
    asd "asd as[d] asd asd;
    asd "asd as[d] asd asd;
    asd "asd as[d] asd asd;
    asd "asd as[d] asd asd;
    
  6. Hit A"<Esc> to obtain:

    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    

With visual-block mode and Surround.vim.

  1. Put the cursor on the second word:

    asd |a|sd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    asd asd asd asd asd;
    
  2. Hit <C-v> to enter visual-block mode and expand your selection toward the bottom and the right:

    asd [asd asd] asd asd;
    asd [asd asd] asd asd;
    asd [asd asd] asd asd;
    asd [asd asd] asd asd;
    asd [asd asd] asd asd;
    asd [asd asd] asd asd;
    asd [asd asd] asd asd;
    
  3. Hit s" to obtain:

    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    

With visual-line mode and :normal.

  1. Hit V to select the whole line and expand it toward the bottom:

    [asd asd asd asd asd;]
    [asd asd asd asd asd;]
    [asd asd asd asd asd;]
    [asd asd asd asd asd;]
    [asd asd asd asd asd;]
    [asd asd asd asd asd;]
    [asd asd asd asd asd;]
    
  2. Execute this command: :'<,'>norm ^wi"<C-v><Esc>eea"<CR> to obtain:

    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    asd "asd asd" asd asd;
    
    • :norm[al] allows you to execute normal mode commands on a range of lines (the '<,'> part is added automatically by Vim and means "act on the selected area")

    • ^ puts the cursor on the first char of the line

    • w moves to the next word

    • i" inserts a " before the cursor

    • <C-v><Esc> is Vim's way to input a control character in this context, here it's <Esc> used to exit insert mode

    • ee moves to the end of the next word

    • a" appends a " after the cursor

    • <CR> executes the command

    Using Surround.vim, the command above becomes

    :'<,'>norm ^wvees"<CR>
    
share|improve this answer

There are several ways to accomplish that in Vim. I don't know which are most similar to Sublime Text's though.


The first one would be via multiline insert mode. Put your cursor to the second "a" in the first line, press Ctrl-V, select all lines, then press I, and put in a doublequote. Pressing <esc> will repeat the operation on every line.


The second one is via macros. Put the cursor on the first character, and start recording a macro with qa. Go the your right with llll, enter insert mode with a, put down a doublequote, exit insert mode, and go back to the beginning of your row with <home> (or equivalent). Press j to move down one row. Stop recording with q. And then replay the macro with @a. Several times.


Does any of the above approaches work for you?

share|improve this answer

if you use the "global" command, you can repeat what you can do on one online an any number of lines.

:g/<search>/.<your ex command>

example:

:g/foo/.s/bar/baz/g

The above command finds all lines that have foo, and replace all occurrences of bar on that line with baz.

:g/.*/

will do on every line

share|improve this answer
3  
The dot is not needed. –  romainl Aug 2 '12 at 19:53

Those are some good solutions given above, but it might also be nice to look at some plugins which provide multiple insert/edit points.

I think this one looks promising:

although if you have a lot of other plugins installed, you may find it has conflicts.

There are some older plugins:

I will try to update this answer with more details about the various approaches when I have them. If you know more, please feel free to edit!

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure what vim is doing, but it is an interesting effect. The way you're describing what you want sounds more like how macros work (:help macro). Something like this would do what you want with macros (starting in normal-mode):

  1. qa: Record macro to a register.
  2. 0w: 0 goto start of line, w jump one word.
  3. i"<Esc>: Enter insert-mode, insert a " and return to normal-mode.
  4. 2e: Jump to end of second word.
  5. a"<Esc>: Append a ".
  6. jq Move to next line and end macro recording.

Taken together: qa0wi"<Esc>2ea"<Esc>

Now you can execute the macro with @a, repeat last macro with @@. To apply to the rest of the file, do something like 99@a which assumes you do not have more than 99 lines, macro execution will end when it reaches end of file.

Here is how to achieve what you want with visual-block-mode (starting in normal mode):

  1. Navigate to where you want the first quote to be.
  2. Enter visual-block-mode, select the lines you want to affect, G to go to the bottom of the file.
  3. Hit I"<Esc>.
  4. Move to the next spot you want to insert a ".
  5. You want to repeat what you just did so a simple . will suffice.
share|improve this answer
3  
No need for 99@a. If you wish to execute a macro on every line of a file try :%norm! @a. –  ldigas Aug 2 '12 at 23:39
    
Without the dots (they're just ends of sentences, not part of the commands) –  ldigas Aug 2 '12 at 23:40

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