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I wrote the following code today to experiment with returning pointers to allocated memory. The program works fine but I do have a few questions:

  1. To allocate the memory for the return value of rmch I use realloc. I understand the function and what it does for the most part I'm just quite not sure what the point of (char *) in the line ret = (char *) realloc(ret, c * sizeof(char)); I understand that realloc(ret, c * sizeof(char)); resizes the allocated memory to #c chars, but what does the (char *) part do?

  2. I do not free the allocated memory that ret points to anywhere, but I do free a pointer to ret which is called in my main function. What is happening to the allocated memory? If it is not being freed how would I go about freeing it?

Code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
char* rmch(char *str, char ch)
{
    char *ret = NULL;
    int c = 0, i;

    for(i = 0; str[i] != '\0'; i++)
    {
        if(str[i] != ch)
        {
            c++;
            ret = (char *) realloc(ret, c * sizeof(char));
            ret[c - 1] = str[i];
        }
    }
    ret[c] = '\0';
    return ret;
}

int main(void)
{
    char *foo = rmch("f o o", ' ');

    printf("%s", foo);
    free(foo);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
In ret = (char *) realloc(ret, c * sizeof(char)); the (char *) casts the void* returned by realloc to a char*. It's required by C++, so people who write lots of C++ tend to cast the return value of malloc and friends. It's pointless and widely discouraged in C. – Daniel Fischer Aug 2 '12 at 19:34
    
You better remove the (char *) you don't understand. It's a typecast (google it!), but its use is discouraged with memory management functions. Also google 'why not cast the return value of malloc()'. – user529758 Aug 2 '12 at 19:35
    
Ah so that's how you accept answers, thank you all very much; at the moment it says I must wait ~4 minutes to accept an answer so I will when that time comes; thanks. – Keith Miller Aug 2 '12 at 19:40
    
BTW, sizeof(char) is 1 by standard. So, c * sizeof(char) is equivalent to c. – Jack Aug 2 '12 at 20:01
    
@DanielFischer: Actually, using malloc in C++ is widely discouraged. – netcoder Aug 2 '12 at 20:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Freeing Foo in main will free the ret you've realloc'd in rmch.

The reason being is free() goes to the address specified by the pointer which is returned by rmch.

Also, as you have tagged this post with the "C" tag, you should never cast the return value of allocations. void *'s are automagically, implicitly promoted to whatever they are stored in, provided they were given the correct byte sizes during allocation.

As an aside, you should never directly store any allocated memory directly into the pointer you are using/will be using as this can lead to memory leaks if the pointer returned is NULL and you were still pointing to old memory.

Better to do this:

temp = realloc();
if( temp == NULL)
{
     printf("realloc failed to reallocated memory!");
     return NULL;
}
ret = temp;

And then you would need to check for a NULL return in your main as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for the response. – Keith Miller Aug 2 '12 at 19:32

Still one more problem on your code, when you run it with valgrind, you got something like this:

toc@UnixServer:~$valgrind --leak-check=full --show-reachable=yes ./realloc_pb
==17077== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==17077== Copyright (C) 2002-2010, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==17077== Using Valgrind-3.6.1-Debian and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==17077== Command: ./realloc_pb
==17077== 
==17077== Invalid write of size 1
==17077==    at 0x80484BF: rmch (realloc_pb.c:19)
==17077==    by 0x80484E3: main (realloc_pb.c:25)
==17077==  Address 0x41b709b is 0 bytes after a block of size 3 alloc'd
==17077==    at 0x402896C: realloc (vg_replace_malloc.c:525)
==17077==    by 0x804848A: rmch (realloc_pb.c:14)
==17077==    by 0x80484E3: main (realloc_pb.c:25)
==17077== 
==17077== Invalid read of size 1
==17077==    at 0x402903D: __GI_strlen (mc_replace_strmem.c:284)
==17077==    by 0x4098739: puts (ioputs.c:37)
==17077==    by 0x4050112: (below main) (libc-start.c:226)
==17077==  Address 0x41b709b is 0 bytes after a block of size 3 alloc'd
==17077==    at 0x402896C: realloc (vg_replace_malloc.c:525)
==17077==    by 0x804848A: rmch (realloc_pb.c:14)
==17077==    by 0x80484E3: main (realloc_pb.c:25)
==17077== 
foo
==17077== 
==17077== HEAP SUMMARY:
==17077==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==17077==   total heap usage: 3 allocs, 3 frees, 6 bytes allocated
==17077== 
==17077== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==17077== 
==17077== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==17077== ERROR SUMMARY: 2 errors from 2 contexts (suppressed: 11 from 6)

Cause you need to allocate more room for the null terminated char, so modify this also:

temp = (char *) realloc(ret, (c + 1) * sizeof(char)); // It's better to use temp pointer as suggested by ardent sonata

The last thing is about the casting malloc or realloc functions it's not really necessary, it's useful for the compiler in case you forgot to add the correct header (stdlib.h), so he can warn you (http://c-faq.com/malloc/mallocnocast.html).

Hope this help.

Regards.

share|improve this answer

malloc or calloc will allocate the memory for the size you mentioned. realloc will resize the already allocated memory, either it can shrink or expand the existing heap buffer.

For example If we are expanding the existing heap buffer from n bytes to n+1 bytes means we have to call realloc like realloc(existing_bufPtr, n+1). Now OS has to increase the existing buffer by one bytes, so it will check if n+1th byte from existing_bufPtr is unallocated to any other purpose. If So it will just expand the size of the existing buffer to n+1 or else it will allocates new buffer in separate place and it will move the values from the existing buffer to the new buffer. And then it will return starting address of the newly allocated buffer.

So we have to do a check whether the return address is same as what we passed if its not same we have to free the previous buffer. So change your code as below

if(str[i] != ch)
{
   c++;
   ret_new = (char *) realloc(ret, c * sizeof(char));
   if (NULL == ret_new)     
   {
       return NULL;
   }
   else if (ret_new != ret)
   {
       free(ret);
       ret = ret_new;
   }

   ret[c - 1] = str[i];
}

Shrinking the existing heap buffer using realloc will not return the new addres. But expanding may return new address.

realloc will return the pointer type as void *, we have to type case it to our type of pointer char *.

Memory allocation function (malloc, calloc or realloc) is always a costly operation for an operating system. So Instead of calling realloc for n times, allocate memory only once using malloc(sizeof(str)), so that performance will be good.

share|improve this answer

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