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Hi i have working code but i would like to print out the coordinates. there is a hashmap that holds Coordinates and Strings. there is a class for Coordinates to allow me to put Coordinates in but when i try to print out it gets confused im clearly not doing something right. Thanks for looking

public class XYTest {
static class Coords {
    int x;
    int y;

    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        Coords c = (Coords) o;
        return c.x == x && c.y == y;
    }

    public Coords(int x, int y) {
        super();
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }

    public int hashCode() {
        return new Integer(x + "0" + y);
    }
}

public static void main(String args[]) {

    HashMap<Coords, String> map = new HashMap<Coords, String>();

    map.put(new Coords(65, 72), "Dan");

    map.put(new Coords(68, 78), "Amn");
    map.put(new Coords(675, 89), "Ann");

    System.out.println(map.size());
}
}
share|improve this question
    
You have to override toString in your Coordinates class –  Benoir Aug 2 '12 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to override toString() in your Coords class.

static class Coords {
    int x;
    int y;

    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        Coords c = (Coords) o;
        return c.x == x && c.y == y;
    }

    public Coords(int x, int y) {
        super();
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }

    public int hashCode() {
        return new Integer(x + "0" + y);
    }

    public String toString()
    {
        return x + ";" + y;
    }
}

What is confusing you is something like this:

XYTest.Coords@3e25a5

What is this? It is the result of the original toString() method. Here is what it does:

return getClass().getName() + '@' + Integer.toHexString(hashCode());

So, overriding it with your own code will get rid of the confusing output :)


Please note that your having great hash-collisions. A much better hashCode() implementation would be:

public int hashCode()
{
    return (x << 16) ^ y;
}

To demonstrate your bad hash code: Some collisions:

  • (0,101) and (1,1)
  • (44,120) and (44012,0)
share|improve this answer
    
ive tried this fix but doesnt work it doesnt seem to like public void. then when i try to change it to public string the hashmap doesnt allow it –  Djchunky123 Aug 5 '12 at 16:02
    
do i have to change something when creating the Hashmap? –  Djchunky123 Aug 5 '12 at 16:21
    
dont worry realised what to do i didnt put it in the map.put function but put it in the println function thanks for the help –  Djchunky123 Aug 5 '12 at 17:20
    
@Djchunky123: Oooops, you were right. I made a mistake, of course the void should be replaced by String. –  Martijn Courteaux Aug 5 '12 at 21:50

As Martijn said override toString()

class Coords {
....

public String toString(){
   return this.x + "-" + this.y;
 }
....

}

...and

  public static void main(String []args){

....

    map.put(new Coords(65, 72).toString(), "Dan");

....

  }
share|improve this answer
    
hi thanks for the help but your slightly off as the Hashmap wont allow tostring in the map.put function you use it in the print function instead thanks for the help :) –  Djchunky123 Aug 5 '12 at 17:22

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