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I'm fairly new to Delphi and have been doing all my memory management manually, but have heard references to Delphi being able to use interfaces to do reference counting and providing some memory management that way. I want to get started with that, but have a few questions.

  1. Just generally, how do I use it. Create the interface and the class implementing it. Then anytime I need that object, have the variable actually be of the Interface type, but instantiate the object and presto? No nee to think about freeing it? No more try-finallys?

  2. It seems very cumbersome to create a bunch of interfaces for classes that really don't need them. Any tips on auto generating those? How do I best organize that? Interface and class in the same file?

  3. What are common pitfalls that might cause me grief? Ex: Does casting the interfaced object to the an object of its class break my reference counting? Or are there any non-obvious ways Delphi would create reference loops? (meaning besides A uses B uses C uses A)

If there are tutorials that cover any of this, that would be great, but I didn't come up with anything in my searches. Thanks.

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6  
Just MHO: keep on managing the memory manually! –  Uwe Raabe Aug 2 '12 at 20:00
1  
Care to elaborate why? Pros/Cons? –  Eric G Aug 2 '12 at 20:10
1  
You might start with the doc wiki; there are about a dozen different links from that page. There are also some useful looking related questions if you search SO using [delphi] interfaces (just type that into the Search bar at the top right of any page). Questions here are supposed to be short and concise, so you can come back after reading some docs with more specific questions, and someone here can help you get answers. :-) –  Ken White Aug 2 '12 at 20:16
2  
Concerning the Pros/Cons: There is only one Pro - you dont't have to call free in the proper places. The Cons - lots of problems that simply don't exist when done manually. You already mentioned some, GDF mentioned some, there are tons of more. –  Uwe Raabe Aug 2 '12 at 20:43
1  
@Uwe: I don't see any problems with the proper approach. Do not turn your objects into interfaces, use guards that use an interface to protect your objects. That way, you can use your objects as usually, but don't (have to) free them. As I said, if done properly, there are no cons. It is a technique used all the time, in other languages. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 7 '12 at 18:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I am currently working with a very large project that takes advantage of the "side affect" of interface reference counting for the purpose of memory management.

My own personal conclusion is that you end up with a lot of code that is overly complex for no better reason than, "I don't have to worry about calling free"

I would strongly advise against this course of action for some very basic reasons:

1) You are using a side affect that exists for the purpose of COM compatibility.

2) You are making your object footprint and efficiency heavier. Interfaces are pointers to lists of pointers.. or something along those lines.

3) Like you stated... you now have to make piles of interfaces for the sole purpose of avoiding freeing memory yourself... this causes more trouble than it's worth in my opinion.

4) Most common bug that will be a HUGE pain to debug will become when an object gets freed, before it's reference. We have special code in our own reference counting to try and test for this problem before software goes out the door.

Now to answer your questions.

1) Given TFoo and interface IFoo you can have a method like the following

function GetFoo: IFoo;
begin
  Result := (TFoo.Create as IFoo);
end;

...and presto, you don't need the finally to free it.

2) Yes like I said, you think it's a great idea, but it turns into a huge pain in the bupkis

3) 2 problems.

A) you have Object1.Interface2 and Object2.Interface1... these objects will never be freed due to the circular reference

B) Freeing the object before all the references are released, I cannot stress how dificult these bugs are to track down...

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It is indeed not always a good idea to turn a class into an interface just for memory management only, and it can indeed be a performance problem. But there is nothing wrong with the guardian interfaces as Deltics mentions. RAII lives from this same side effect and has no performance problems, as you are using the class directly. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 2 '12 at 23:22
    
+1, not for the answer to the question, but for the advise against using it ;) –  jachguate Aug 3 '12 at 1:17
    
Thanks. This and many others here have convinced me that dealing with a few try/finally's isn't that bad. –  Eric G Aug 3 '12 at 18:25
    
@RudyVelthuis I agree with you on your points, but Deltics example, although elegant, only has the advantages you mentioned if I'm creating and using the object within that code segement. If I have to create a global object and pass it around, Deltics technique will no longer be effective. And as far as I can tell, using Deltics solution lowers my code from 4 lines to 2 lines and keeps the lifecycle of the object within the code block. I don't see real bang for the buck here, but that's just me... –  GDF Aug 6 '12 at 21:57
    
@GDF: If it must be global, then use a global variable. And there is a big bang for the buck: you can't forget to free the object, which is one of the most made errors. The longer the method, the more likely you are to forget it. RAII (which is what Deltic's technique is generally called) is a very valuable programming idiom. Oh, and no need to free such objects at all. The RAII object will take care of it. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 7 '12 at 18:34

The most common complaint leading to the desire for "automatic garbage collection" in Delphi is the way that even short-lived temporary objects have to be disposed of manually and that you have to write a fair amount of "boiler-plate" code to ensure that this takes place when exceptions occur.

For example, creating a TStringList for some temporary sorting or other algorithmic purpose within a procedure:

procedure SomeStringsOperation(const aStrings: TStrings);
var
  list: TStringList;
begin
  list := TStringList.Create;
  try
      :
     // do some work with "list"
      :
  finally
    list.Free;
  end;
end;

As you mentioned, objects that implement the COM protocol of reference counted lifetime management avoid this by cleaning themselves up when all references to them have been released.

But since TStringList isn't a COM object, you cannot enjoy the convenience this offers.

Fortunately there is a way to use COM reference counting to take care of these things without have to create all new, COM versions of the classes you wish to use. You don't even need to switch to an entirely COM based model.

I created a very simple utility class to allow me to "wrap" ANY object inside a lightweight COM container specifically for the purpose of getting this automatic cleanup behaiour. Using this technique you can replace the above example with:

procedure SomeStringsOperation(const aStrings: TStrings);
var
  list: TStringList;
begin
  AutoFree(@list);

  list := TStringList.Create;

    :
  // do some work with "list"
    :
end;

The AutoFree() function call creates an "anonymous" interfaced object that is Release()'d in the exit code generated by the compiler for the procedure. This autofree object is passed a pointer to the variable that references the object you wish to be free'd. Among other things this allows us to use the AutoFree() function as a pseudo-"declaration", placing any and ALL AutoFree() calls at the top of the method, as close as possible to the variable declarations that they reference, before we have even created any objects.

Full details of the implementation, including source code and further examples, are on my blog in this post.

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1  
+1 very nice indeed! –  David Heffernan Aug 2 '12 at 21:07
2  
@David: very nice indeed, but not new. I donated a similar solution to JEDI many years ago. Barry Kelly has a few better implementations of the same principle in his blog. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 2 '12 at 23:24
    
Rudy, I never claimed it was "new", merely offered it as an answer to the OP's question. You will also note that the blog post of mine that I reference was itself posted many years ago. Indeed, BK commented on it himself, pointing out that his solution had different goals and conceding the point that his "smart pointers" had issues w.r.t convenience of use. When seeking to reduce burdens (the OP's aim), replacing one set of irksome burdens with another often results merely in an increase in complexity with a net zero reduction of irk. ;) –  Deltics Aug 3 '12 at 0:16
    
@Deltics, what about creating more than one TStringList over the list variable, without properly freeing it. It will cause leaks, right? Because of that I think a pseudo-solution like this is fragile. Correct me if I'm wrong. –  jachguate Aug 3 '12 at 1:14
    
AutoFree isn't offered as a catch-all solution to garbage collection, merely as a way to reduce the amount of boiler plate involved in using an explicit try..finally. The problem of a programmer erroneously re-using/overwriting the variable applies equally to both. AutoFree doesn't try to eliminate that problem, but it doesn't create that problem either. –  Deltics Aug 3 '12 at 1:28

The memory management of interfaces is done through implementation of _AddRef and _Release which are implemented by TInterfacedObject.

In general using interfaces to make memory management less cumbersome can be a nice idea, but you need to take care of these things:

  • Make sure the classes that implement interfaces are derived from TInterfacedObject or roll your own ancestor class that provides good implementations for _AddRef and _Release
  • Use either/or: so either user interfaces references, or use object instance references, don't mix them. That can be problematic when implementing interfaces in components (as those derive from TComponent, not TInterfacedObject)
  • Don't go the TInterfacedComponent way as that mixes Owner based memory management and _AddRef/_Release based memory management
  • Watch circular interface references (you can go around implementing "weak interface references" mentioned here and implemented here)
  • You need to maintain extra code as you need to define interfaces for the parts your classes that you want to expose, and keep those two in sync (you could Model Maker Code Explorer for this; it allows you to extract interfaces and in general boost your development because it manages the interface/implementation parts of code in single-actions)
  • You need some extra plumbing to create instances of the underlying classes. You can use the factory pattern for that.

That is not always effectively, but does answer a few of your underlying questions.

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Shortest possible answer: The default delphi memory model is that owners free the objects they own. All other references are weak references and must let go before the owner does. "Sharing" an object that has a lifetime shorter than the entire lifetime of the app is rarely done. Reference counting is rarely done, and when it is done, it is only done by experts, or else it adds more bugs and crashes than it solves.

Learn idiomatic delphi style and try to imitate it, don't fight the grain. Sadly, people think that "program against interfaces, not implementations" means "Use IUnknown everywhere". That's not true. I recommend you don't use COM IUnknown interfaces, and use abstract base classes instead. The only thing you can't do is implement two abstract base classes in a single class, and the need for that is rare.

Update: I've recently found it helpful to use COM Interfaces (IUnknown based) to help me separate out my model and controller implementations from my UI classes. So I do find using IUnknown based interfaces useful. But there is not a lot of documentation and prior art out there to base your efforts on. I'd like to see a "cookbook" style recipe that lays all this out for people, so they can work without the usual problem of combining interface and non-interface based lifetime management, and all the trouble that comes while you get used to that extra complexity.

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Switching to interfaces only for avoiding manual Free's is senseless. Little economy in Free/try-finally lines will hardly compensate the necessity of declaring both g/setters and properties in the interface not mentioning the necessity of keeping the intf/class declarations in sync. Interfaces also bring performance loss due to implicit finalize code and reference counting. If performance is not the main point and all you want to achieve is autofreeing, I'd recommend using some universal interface wrappers like the one Deltics suggested.

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