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I have 4 different lengths of data (in rows) and they all have a differing ammount of columns. I need to apply an equation to each of these columns and then extract the max value from each of them.

The equation I am trying to use is:

averg = mean([interpolate(1:end-2),interpolate(3:end)],2); % this is just getting your average value.
real_num = interpolate(2:end-1);
streaking1 = (abs(real_num-averg)./averg)*100;

An example of one of my data sets is 5448 rows by 13 columns

EDIT

This is the current adapation of Ben A.'s Solution and it is working.

A = interpolate;    
averg = (A(1:end-2,:) + A(3:end,:))/2;
center_A = A(2:end-1,:);
streaking = [];
for idx = 1:size(A,2)
    streaking(:,idx) = (abs(center_A(idx,:)-averg(idx,:))./averg(idx,:))*100;
end 
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I'm guessing that this is 4 different matricies? Like A is your 5448 x 13, B could be 4689 x 12, C 1235 x 124 and D 534 x 32? Also, is interpolate a function call for you or a matrix name? If it is a function could you please edit with a brief explanation of what it does, expected inputs and output? –  Ben A. Aug 3 '12 at 12:38
    
interpolate is a matrix name. I never have multiple matrices up at once, it only works with one per entire code use. And yeah your example of the different sized matrices works just fine. –  Ben B. Aug 3 '12 at 16:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not entirely sure that I fully follow what you're doing in each step, but here is a stab at it:

A = interpolate;    
averg = (A(1:end-2,:) + A(3:end,:))/2;
center_A = A(2:end-1,:);
streaking = [];
for idx = 1:size(A,2)
    streaking(:,idx) = (abs(center_A(idx,:)-averg(idx,:))./averg(idx,:))*100;
end 

Averg will be a vector of means for each column. I just use the values in the given column as the real_num variable that you had before. I'm not clear why you would need to index that the way you are as nothing is at risk of breaking index rules.

If this helps, great! If not let me know and I'll see if I can revise somewhat.

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The reason real_num is indexed like this is because what this equation is doing is defining a center value and then taking the value before and after and doing the calculation. The index keeps the first and last value from being used because the first value does not have a before value and the final value does not have an after value and therefor couldn't be calculated. I dont have a way of testing this until wednesday (As i am on vacation) but i will let you know as soon as i can. –  Ben B. Aug 3 '12 at 17:20
    
Sounds good. You should just be able to adapt the index value in the loop to get the results you want then. –  Ben A. Aug 3 '12 at 18:26
    
I have edited the solution to my tailored needs for it as well as changed some things around. It is now working as I need it to. You may alter your solution to reflect my edit, but i felt that adding this as an answer to my own question was unfair to the bulk of the work which was done be you. So i am accepting your answer. Thank you for your help. –  Ben B. Aug 8 '12 at 17:13

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