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I have got huge correlation matrix, but the following is just an example:

    set.seed(1234)

corrmat <- matrix(round (rnorm (36, 0, 0.3),2), ncol=6) 
rownames (corrmat) <- colnames (corrmat) <- c("A", "b1", "b2", "C", "L", "ctt")
diag(corrmat) <- NA 
corrmat[upper.tri (corrmat)] <- NA 
            A    b1    b2     C     L ctt
    A      NA    NA    NA    NA    NA  NA
    b1   0.08    NA    NA    NA    NA  NA
    b2   0.33 -0.17    NA    NA    NA  NA
    C   -0.70 -0.27 -0.03    NA    NA  NA
    L    0.13 -0.14 -0.15 -0.13    NA  NA
    ctt  0.15 -0.30 -0.27  0.14 -0.28  NA

> melt(corrmat)

       X1  X2  value
    1    A   A    NA
    2   b1   A  0.08
    3   b2   A  0.33
    4    C   A -0.70
    5    L   A  0.13
    6  ctt   A  0.15
    7    A  b1    NA
    8   b1  b1    NA
    9   b2  b1 -0.17
    10   C  b1 -0.27
    11   L  b1 -0.14
    12 ctt  b1 -0.30
    13   A  b2    NA
    14  b1  b2    NA
    15  b2  b2    NA
    16   C  b2 -0.03
    17   L  b2 -0.15
    18 ctt  b2 -0.27
    19   A   C    NA
    20  b1   C    NA
    21  b2   C    NA
    22   C   C    NA
    23   L   C -0.13
    24 ctt   C  0.14
    25   A   L    NA
    26  b1   L    NA
    27  b2   L    NA
    28   C   L    NA
    29   L   L    NA
    30 ctt   L -0.28
    31   A ctt    NA
    32  b1 ctt    NA
    33  b2 ctt    NA
    34   C ctt    NA
    35   L ctt    NA
    36 ctt ctt    NA

What I am looking is correlation values between adjacent only - means that between A-b1, b1-b2,b2-C, C-L, L-ctt (in the order in column). I need to remove other values and NA. Thus expected will be:

        X1   X2  value
    2   b1   A   0.08
    9   b2   b1 -0.17
    16   C   b2  -0.03
    23   L   C  -0.13
    30  ctt  L  -0.28

Thus they are in: A-b1-b2-C-L-ctt order.

Is there a easy way to filter it ?

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here is one way using the often overlooked functions row() and col()

> corrmat ## my version as there was no set.seed
        A    b1    b2    C     L ctt
A      NA    NA    NA   NA    NA  NA
b1   0.03    NA    NA   NA    NA  NA
b2  -0.41 -0.02    NA   NA    NA  NA
C    0.11  0.61 -0.18   NA    NA  NA
L   -0.28 -0.28  0.39 0.01    NA  NA
ctt -0.21 -0.41 -0.55 0.34 -0.13  NA

> corrmat[row(corrmat) == col(corrmat) + 1]
[1]  0.03 -0.02 -0.18  0.01 -0.13

Note that we are indexing the matrix corrmat as a vector here, and the bit in the brackets says return elements where the row index of each element matches the column index of each element plus 1. Using -1 would give you the superdiagonal (i.e. above the diagonal).

To put it all together:

out <- data.frame(X1 = rownames(corrmat)[-1],
                  X2 = head(colnames(corrmat), -1),
                  Value = corrmat[row(corrmat) == col(corrmat) + 1])

> out
   X1 X2 Value
1  b1  A  0.03
2  b2 b1 -0.02
3   C b2 -0.18
4   L  C  0.01
5 ctt  L -0.13
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Here's one way:

n = rownames(corrmat)
pair.table = data.frame(X1=head(n, -1), X2=tail(n, -1), value=diag(tail(corrmat, -1)))

Result:

> pair.table
  X1  X2 value
1  A  b1  0.08
2 b1  b2 -0.17
3 b2   C -0.03
4  C   L -0.13
5  L ctt -0.28
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thanks !!! for quick and sweet solution –  shNIL Aug 2 '12 at 20:41
    
You're welcome. I just now edited it to an even shorter solution using diag. –  David Robinson Aug 2 '12 at 20:41
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It's just 1 off of the diagonal of the correlation matrix. So, all you need to do is just shift the diagonal to be that and you're set. Remove the first row and last column and then it's just diag.

corrmat <- corrmat[-1,-ncol(corrmat)]
data.frame(X1 = rownames(corrmat), X2 = colnames(corrmat), r = diag(corrmat))
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OK, maybe that's actually what David Robinson did in his new edit. I just removed the unnecessary row and column first. –  John Aug 2 '12 at 20:54
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My solution based which generates combinations (comb function) using row/colnames and 'looking up' the entry in the square distance matrix. SIF stands for Simple interaction file.

makeSIF <- function(x) {
# args - 
#    x - m*m distance or correlation matrix
# @returns data frame in SIF format 
#
    sif <- as.data.frame(t(combn(as.character(rownames(x)), 2)))
    #print(sif)
    weight <- apply(sif, 1, indexDMatFromLookup, x)
    sif2 <- data.frame(sif, weight)
    return(sif2)

}

indexDMatFromLookup <- function(lookup, x) {
    return(indexDMat(x, lookup[1], lookup[2]))
}

indexDMat <- function(x, i1,i2) {
    return(x[i1,i2])
}

Seeing the other answers, this is probably much slower.

edit: it's actually not too bad.

system.time(replicate(1000, makeSIF(corrmat)))

user system elapsed

0.976 0.000 0.975

system.time(replicate(1000, data.frame(X1=head(n, -1), X2=tail(n, -1), value=diag(tail(corrmat, -1)))))

user system elapsed

0.656 0.000 0.658

only a fraction of a second slower than john's method.

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