Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know there have been a couple questions asked/answered on this topic but I need more specific help as this is my first time attempting something like this. I have tried to implement the answers to those questions and am still having errors. I need to write a dynamic amount of serialized objects to a file and then read from that file to retrieve the objects. I'm working in android FYI.

Here's my write() and overridden writeStreamHeader():

//check and see if there is a file already created to hold patterns, if not, make one
//only created once or if file is deleted; append to it if it's already created
    if(!new File(getFilesDir()+"/Patterns").exists())
        {
            try {
                fos = new FileOutputStream(getFilesDir()+FILENAME, true);
                out = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
                 } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IOException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        else
        {
        try {
            out = new AppendingObjectOutputStream(fos);
            } catch (IOException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
            }
         }

        //create a pattern of points. Max amount of Patterns is 100.
                    if(patternindex!=100)
                    { 
                        Patterns[patternindex] = new Pattern(ActivePoints, name, xshift, yshift, scaling, rotation);
                        try {
                            //out.reset();
                            out.writeObject(Patterns[patternindex]); //write the object
                            //out.close();
                        } catch (IOException e) {
                            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                            e.printStackTrace();
                        }
                        patternindex++;
                        dialog.dismiss();
                    }

public class AppendingObjectOutputStream extends ObjectOutputStream {

      public AppendingObjectOutputStream(OutputStream out) throws IOException {
        super(out);
      }
      @Override
      protected void writeStreamHeader() throws IOException {
          out.reset();
        // do not write a header
      }

    }

I check to see if that file exists (it does because I've run this code) and then my writeObject() crashes the program with a NULLPointerException after creating the "special" ObjectOutputStream.

Here is my deserializing/read:

String PatternNames[] = new String[2];
Pattern Patterns[] = new Pattern[2];
FileInputStream fis;
ObjectInputStream in;

try {
            fis = new FileInputStream(getFilesDir()+"/Patterns");
            in = new ObjectInputStream(fis);

            for(int i=0;i<2;i++)//just trying to read 2 objects to start with
            {
                {
                    Patterns[i] = (Pattern) in.readObject();
                    PatternNames[i] = Patterns[i].getName();
                }


            }
            in.close();
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e1) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
        catch (IOException e1) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e1.printStackTrace();
                }

Any help is greatly appreciated as I have spent a fair amount of time trying to figure this out. I know there have been people who have got this whole thing to work. As a side note, I have gotten serialize/deserialize working with one object saved to a different file but this is mostly useless given my project requirements.

share|improve this question
    
Post the stack trace. –  EJP Aug 5 '12 at 9:49

1 Answer 1

You are only constructing fos in the case that the file doesn't exist. You need it in both cases.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.