Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on creating an XSD for a web service that will take in an ID number as an element in the XML. These ID numbers consist of 10 consecutive digits ([0-9]{10}), but I was trying to create a regular expression that could exclude certain elements from this range.

For example, here is the restriction I have currently in my XSD:

    <xsd:restriction base="xsd:string">
        <xsd:pattern value="[0-9]{10}" />
    </xsd:restriction>  

I need the restriction to allow a string of [0-9]{10} that doesn't fit the following IDs:

    All 0's:         [0]{10}
    Starting with 6: [6][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]
    Starting with 000: [0][0][0][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]
    Starting with 999: [9][9][9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]
    Ends with 2 0's: [0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0][0]
    4 0's in Middle: [0-9][0-9][0-9][0][0][0][0][0-9][0-9][0-9]

Is this possible to do from within the XSD or regular expression?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'd rephrase your restrictions a bit:

  • The first digit must not be a 6.
  • At least one of the last two digits must not be a zero.
  • At least one of the middle four digits must not be a zero.

The first restriction, an ID only consisting of zeroes, is actually included in the two last restrictions.

The first restriction can be expressed by a set of allowed characters that does not include 6, i.e. [0-57-9].

For the other restrictions, a straightforward solution is to start at the beginning of a section that must not consist only of zeroes and assume a non-zero digit; if that assumption is true, the remaining digits may include zeroes; otherwise the first digit in that section must be a zero and for the remaining characters, this rule can be repeated recursively until only one character is left: ([1-9][0-9]{3}|0(... repeat for three digits, then two digits, ...))

Therefore, a suitable RegEx would be:

[0-57-9][0-9]{2}([1-9][0-9]{3}|0([1-9][0-9]{2}|0([1-9][0-9]|0[1-9])))[0-9]([1-9][0-9]|0[1-9])

Update: The additional restrictions require the following:

  • At least one of the first three digits must not be a 0.
  • At least one of the first three digits must not be a 9.

This can be included the same way as above, accepting either anything except 0 and 9, or either of these two numbers:

([1-57-8][0-9]{2}|0([1-9][0-9]|[0-9][1-9])|9([0-8][0-9]|[0-9][0-8]))([1-9][0-9]{3}|0([1-9][0-9]{2}|0([1-9][0-9]|0[1-9])))[0-9]([1-9][0-9]|0[1-9])

The new part is in the front of the expression:

([1-57-8][0-9]{2}|0([1-9][0-9]|[0-9][1-9])|9([0-8][0-9]|[0-9][0-8]))

So,

  • either the ID starts with neither a 0 nor with a 9. In that case, there are no restrictions for the next two digits.
  • or the ID starts with a 0. In that case, one of the next two digits must not be a zero, either the first one or the second one.
  • or the ID starts with a 9. In that case, one of the next two digits must not be a nine, either the first one or the second one.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help. That definitely got me closer to what I was looking for. In my original post, I revised the restrictions to include a few other conditions. –  Randmness Aug 3 '12 at 13:45
    
@Randmness: I have added an explanation on how to include the two additional restrictions. –  O. R. Mapper Aug 3 '12 at 14:03
    
You are awesome. Thanks again. Worked like a charm. –  Randmness Aug 3 '12 at 14:23
    
@Randmness: Some possible other solution just came to my mind: With so many restrictions, or even more of them, it might be adviseable to define your simple type in various levels of restrictiveness, starting with xs:string and every time restricting the set of allowable values with another regex pattern that represents one or more of your restriction rules. That may increase maintainability and readability of your regex. –  O. R. Mapper Aug 3 '12 at 17:01
    
Great suggestion. That will definitely help to clean it up a little. Thanks again. –  Randmness Aug 3 '12 at 17:37
add comment

I think this will cover it:

[01-57-9]\d{2}([1-9]\d{3}|\d[1-9]\d{2}|\d{2}[1-9]\d|\d{3}[1-9])\d([1-9]\d|\d[1-9])

Broken down:

[01-57-9] First character is a number-not-6.

\d{2} Next two characters can be any digit.

Then there is a (...|...|...|...) section, ORing all of these together.

[1-9]\d{3} Of the next 4 digits, the first cannot be zero.

OR

\d[1-9]\d{2} Of the next 4, the second cannot be zero.

OR

\d{2}[1-9]\d Or the third is not zero.

OR

\d{3}[1-9] Or the fourth is not zero.

Then we have another \d, any digit.

Finally,

([1-9]\d|\d[1-9]) either the first or the second of the last two digits cannot be 0.

Since we have two sections that demand at least one number is not zero, there is not way for all 10 to be zero.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help. That definitely got me closer to what I was looking for. In my original post, I revised the restrictions to include a few other conditions. –  Randmness Aug 3 '12 at 13:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.