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@@Version 1

Using SQL Server 2008, I am trying to cascade values down a column. I have a table with group id (GID) and Seq containing ordering for records within the group. For the columns present, in this case Name and Salary - my real table has over 50 columns, if they contain NULLs I need to update the NULL value with the value from the previous row for that column that contain a non-null value.

Here is something to illustrate this:

GID Seq Name    Salary
1   1   James   NULL
1   2   NULL    100
1   3   NULL    NULL
2   1   NULL    81
2   2   Smith   NULL
2   3   NULL    NULL
3   1   Charles NULL
3   2   NULL    NULL
3   3   Brown   NULL
3   4   NULL    75
4   0   Ron 50
4   1   NULL    20
4   2   NULL    NULL

My result should be:

GID Seq Name    Salary
1   1   James   NULL
1   2   James   100
1   3   James   100
2   1   NULL    81
2   2   Smith   81
2   3   Smith   81
3   1   Charles NULL
3   2   Charles NULL
3   3   Brown   NULL
3   4   Brown   75
4   0   Ron 50
4   1   Ron 20
4   2   Ron 20

I am looking to do this without using dynamic SQL, loops or cursors.

Code for simple test case:

DECLARE @Test TABLE (GID int, Seq int, Name varchar(50), Salary decimal) 

INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (1, 1, 'James', NULL)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (1, 2, NULL, 100.40)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (1, 3, NULL, NULL)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (2, 1, NULL, 80.50)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (2, 2, 'Smith', NULL)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (2, 3, NULL, NULL)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (3, 1, 'Charles', NULL)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (3, 2, NULL, NULL)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (3, 3, 'Brown', NULL)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (3, 4, NULL, 75)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (4, 0, 'Ron', 50)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (4, 1, NULL, 20)
INSERT INTO @Test VALUES (4, 2, NULL, NULL)

SELECT * FROM @Test

@@Version 2 Thanks GilM for the solution to @@Version 1. I have made a small addition to the problem. The starting number in the Seq column may be either a 0 or 1. In the solution to the first problem the anchor in the recursive CTE refers to 1, what if its either a 1 or 0? The last 3 rows of data (GID = 4) were added to all the above three code blocks in this version.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
+1 for including test case –  podiluska Aug 2 '12 at 21:11
    
Karthik - don't you think this question is a bit ridiculous when you can just ask eric? –  EBarr Aug 2 '12 at 21:22
    
Can you edit and post an @@Version just in case an answer becomes that specific? –  EBarr Aug 2 '12 at 21:30
    
I already asked Mr.Eric a long time ago, don't you remember? Version added. –  KShan Aug 3 '12 at 2:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about this?:

;WITH CTE AS (
SELECT GID, SEQ, Name, Salary
FROM @Test t1
WHERE SEQ = (SELECT MIN(SEQ) FROM @Test t2 WHERE t2.GID = t1.GID)
UNION ALL
SELECT t.GID, t.SEQ, COALESCE(t.Name,c.Name), COALESCE(t.Salary,c.Salary)
FROM CTE c
JOIN @Test t ON t.GID = c.GID AND t.SEQ = c.SEQ+1
)
UPDATE t SET 
    Name = c.Name,
    Salary =  c.Salary
FROM @Test t
JOIN CTE c ON c.GID = t.GID AND c.Seq = t.SEQ
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks GilM! Your solution works, I knew its was going to have be a recursive CTE but didn't undertand it enough (yet) to write it. I've updated this: SELECT GID, SEQ, Name, Salary FROM @Test WHERE SEQ = 1 To SELECT T.GID, T.SEQ, Name, Salary FROM @Test T JOIN (SELECT GID, MIN(Seq) Seq FROM @Test GROUP BY GID) S ON T.GID = S.GID AND T.Seq = S.Seq –  KShan Aug 3 '12 at 4:43
    
The update is intended to take care of @@Version 2 of my problem. Is there is a better option for this? –  KShan Aug 3 '12 at 4:57
    
Your update looks good to me. –  GilM Aug 3 '12 at 6:45
    
I think you could have also just replaced the "WHERE SEQ = 1" with "WHERE SEQ = (SELECT MIN(SEQ) FROM @Test t2 WHERE t2.GID = t1.GID)". Also you'd need to add the t1 alias to the FROM above. –  GilM Aug 3 '12 at 6:57
    
I updated my solution with my suggested fix for Version 2. –  GilM Aug 3 '12 at 7:04
update T set
  Name =   (
           select top(1) T1.Name
           from @Test as T1
           where T1.GID = T.GID and
                 T1.Seq <= T.Seq and
                 T1.Name is not null
           order by T1.Seq desc
           ),
  Salary = (
           select top(1) T1.Salary
           from @Test as T1
           where T1.GID = T.GID and
                 T1.Seq <= T.Seq and
                 T1.Salary is not null
           order by T1.Seq desc
           )
from @Test as T
where T.Name is null or 
      T.Salary is null

With 50 columns there will be a lot of typing and a lot of correlated sub-queries.

Here is a version that uses XML instead. Less typing and performance could be better.

with C as
(
  select GID,
         (
         select *
         from @Test as T2
         where T1.GID = T2.GID
         order by T2.Seq desc
         for xml path('row'), type
         ) as X
  from @Test as T1
  group by GID
)
update T set
       Name   = C.X.value('(/row[Seq<=sql:column("T.Seq")]/Name)[1]',   'varchar(50)'),
       Salary = C.X.value('(/row[Seq<=sql:column("T.Seq")]/Salary)[1]', 'decimal')
from @Test as T
  inner join C 
    on T.GID = C.GID

SE-Data

share|improve this answer
    
I think this would work (haven't tested), but since the OP said the real table has over 50 columns, it seems impractical to have a subquery for each column. –  GilM Aug 3 '12 at 6:48
    
@GilM I agree that 50 columns is impractical :). Added a version that allows for less typing and might perform better. Your version works just fine as long as you can guarantee that Seq is indeed sequential. –  Mikael Eriksson Aug 3 '12 at 8:20
    
Nice! I have no idea how that performs, but it's very creative. –  GilM Aug 3 '12 at 13:52
    
@MikaelEriksson I can indeed guarantee that Seq is sequential, it is generated by a ROW_NUMBER() OVER, I just didnt want to add in that extra complexity to the example. –  KShan Aug 3 '12 at 13:54

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