Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a script that creates a bunch of threads, runs a program to use the threads to run tasks from a queue, and returns something from each thread. I want to count how many of these returned successfully, so I set a variable "successful=0" and increment it every time the queue reports a task completed successfully.

However, I'm getting "UnboundLocalError: local variable 'successful' referenced before assignment"

What's going on?

Here's some example code:

successful = 0

q = Queue(200)
for i in range(100):
    t=Thread(target=foo)
    t.daemon=True
    t.start()
def foo():
    while True:
        task=q.get()
        #do some work
        print task
        successful+=1 # triggers an error
        q.task_done()
for i in range(100):
    q.put("Foo")
q.join()
print successful
share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted
successful+=1

is not a thread-safe operation. With multiple threads trying to increment a shared global variable, collisions may happen and successful will not be incremented properly.

To avoid this error, use a lock:

lock = threading.Lock()
def foo():
    global successful
    while True:
        ...
        with lock:
            successful+=1 

Here is some code to demonstrate that x += 1 is not threadsafe:

import threading
lock = threading.Lock()
x = 0
def foo():
   global x
   for i in xrange(1000000):
       # with lock:    # Uncomment this to get the right answer
            x += 1
threads = [threading.Thread(target=foo), threading.Thread(target=foo)]
for t in threads:
    t.daemon = True    
    t.start()
for t in threads:
    t.join()

print(x)

yields:

% test.py 
1539065
% test.py 
1436487

These results do not agree and are less than the expected 2000000. Uncommenting the lock yields the correct result.

share|improve this answer
    
Damn, you're right. I totally forgot about thread locking. – Oliver Aug 3 '12 at 15:49

The problem happens because a variable that is assigned inside a function is considered to be local to that function. If you want to modify the value of a variable successfull, that is created outside a foo, you need to explicitly inform the interpreter that you are going to work with a global variable inside a function. This can be done in the following way:

def foo():
    global successfull
    while True:
        task=q.get()
        #do some work
        print task
        successful+=1 # triggers an error
        q.task_done()

Now the code should work as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Haha! I just figured it out. I'll give you the answer anyway :-) – Oliver Aug 2 '12 at 22:22

Based on Python variable scope question,

I should have put "global successful" under "def foo():".

Oops.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.