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If I have two chunks of code and I want to toggle between them (say, for testing purposes), I've realized you can use a comment like this:

//*
<chunk #1, active code here>
//*/

/*
<chunk #2, commented out code here>
//*/

Then to switch between them I just need to add a / above #2 and remove a / from above #1. I know IDE's have "toggle comment" commands, but I think this is faster and less messy.

/*
<chunk #1, active code here>
//*/

//*
<chunk #2, commented out code here>
//*/

This obviously works because the line comment actually comments out the /* so the block comment isn't parsed, and same thing for the end where the // actually comments out the */.

My question is if there is a better way of doing something like this with comments, or if this method is as 'slick' as you can get with commenting?

share|improve this question
3  
whats slicker then 2 keystrokes? –  hackattack Aug 2 '12 at 22:11
    
@hackattack If you have debugging code throughout multiple classes, this takes more than just 2 keystrokes. –  Code-Apprentice Aug 2 '12 at 22:13
2  
@hackattack: 1 keystroke. –  Mark Byers Aug 2 '12 at 22:22
    
@Mark Byers true –  hackattack Aug 2 '12 at 22:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Let me start by saying that I think it's evil to use cryptic systems of slashes and asterisks to toggle code, but let's try this anyway.

First block selected

//*
public static void doStuff()
{
    System.out.println("foo");
}
/*/
public static void doStuff()
{
    System.out.println("bar");
}
//*/

Second block selected (the only change is removing the first slash):

/*
public static void doStuff()
{
    System.out.println("foo");
}
/*/
public static void doStuff()
{
    System.out.println("bar");
}
//*/

It works because of the /*/ in the middle which functions either as on open or close comment block depending on whether or not there was an already opened comment block.

It's similar to your own approach, but the advantage is you can toggle by changing only a single character instead of having to change two characters. So it's a slightly more efficient way to be evil.

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+1 for the pure evilness of your solution. –  biziclop Aug 2 '12 at 22:20
    
beautiful, I'll probably start using this! –  WOUNDEDStevenJones Aug 2 '12 at 23:10

One way is something like this:

public class DebugOptions {
  public static final boolean DEBUG_FLAG = true;
};

And then inside your function, you can have code like:

if(DebugOptions.DEBUG_FLAG) {
  // Do some debugging stuff
} else {
  // Do something else
}

Alternatively, each class can have its own flag, but the pattern is the same. Also, you may want to have multiple flags or an enum to provide different levels of debugging services.

When you set the boolean flag to false, most compilers will optimize away any unexecuted code.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that last bit is true, in fact I'm reasonably certain it isn't. With private static final flags, it is. Either way, the JIT compiler will get rid of it eventually. –  biziclop Aug 2 '12 at 22:17
    
@biziclop Thanks for the clarification. I jump between C++ and Java too much and so I get some of these details confused when they are different between the two languages. –  Code-Apprentice Aug 2 '12 at 22:21
    
Yes, I can imagine it not being easy. The point really is that if the constant is in another file, there's nothing stopping from someone changing its value and recompiling just that file. So the compiler can't be sure that the value of the constant will be the same at runtime. –  biziclop Aug 2 '12 at 22:33
    
@biziclop Yup, that makes sense. –  Code-Apprentice Aug 2 '12 at 22:34
    
It would make sense, but unfortunately that's not how it works. The public static final constant is actually inlined in other files too. Changing the value, then recompiling only the file containing the constant, will not update the value in the file using it. –  Jorn Aug 2 '12 at 22:45

Messy, your code is unreadable. With IDE functionality it needs press hotkey twice. 1 or 2 secs it's not an economy.

Better debugging approach to have wrapper method that allows to work one of the methods at time depending on param.

void debug(Mode m) {
  switch m : {
    case M1: method1();
    case M2: method2();
    ...
  }
}

call it in code debug(M1). If you really care about speed you just need to change 1 from 2.

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