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I have been trying to just get the equivalent of this C# code in C++ for a couple days now, and it's not working out.

Here is my C# code:

RSAParameters rsaParams = new RSAParameters();
rsaParams.Modulus = someByteArray;
rsaParams.Exponent = someByteArray1;
rsaParams.D = someByteArray2;
rsaParams.DP = someByteArray3;
rsaParams.DQ = someByteArray4;
rsaParams.P = someByteArray5;
rsaParams.Q = someByteArray6;
rsaParams.InverseQ = someByteArray7;

using (RSACryptoServiceProvider rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider())
{
    rsa.ImportParameters(rsaParams);
    byte[] encryptedData = rsa.Encrypt(toEncrypt, false);
}

I want to just have the same exact results, but in C++ (cross platform). I have looked at many libraries/classes, but they don't seem resonable. First of all, Crypto++ is great and all, but all I want is RSA, so having all of their hashing/encryption/whatever else algorithms is just a waste as I look at it. I found this class, which I thought was good because it is only RSA and is pretty small. The problem is, is that the parameters either aren't named the same as the C# ones, or it doesn't support it. I feel like I shouldn't have to learn what each parameter means in RSA just to implement it, as I just want to complete a simple task here. Thanks.

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Is the reason you need the same parameters because you have a front end in C# and a back end in C++? –  Clark Gaebel Aug 2 '12 at 23:06
    
No it's because I was just testing some stuff with C#, and my application will be in C++, so I just need to transfer it over. –  hetelek Aug 2 '12 at 23:07
1  
Since the RSA encryption you are using includes random padding you will never get the exact same results even if you have succeeded in implementing a correct, compatible C++ version. Furthermore, only the first two fields (Modulus and Exponent) are needed or used for RSA encryption. –  GregS Aug 3 '12 at 22:39
    
Alright, thank you. But let's say I do only want to use the modulus and exponent. How could I generate the other ones, because if I take the other ones away (in C#), it throw a "Bad Key." error. –  hetelek Aug 4 '12 at 7:11
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1 Answer 1

The properties of the RSAParameters struct are based on the Chinese Remainder Algorithm. Have you looked at the OpenSSL crypto library?

The RSA structure consists of several BIGNUM components. It can contain public as well as private RSA keys:

struct
    {
    BIGNUM *n;              // public modulus
    BIGNUM *e;              // public exponent
    BIGNUM *d;              // private exponent
    BIGNUM *p;              // secret prime factor
    BIGNUM *q;              // secret prime factor
    BIGNUM *dmp1;           // d mod (p-1)
    BIGNUM *dmq1;           // d mod (q-1)
    BIGNUM *iqmp;           // q^-1 mod p
    // ...
    };
RSA
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Why do I feel like it's difficult to setup? I downloaded the latest from openssl.org/source, and I try including the 'rsa.h' from the includes folder which results in errors... I must be missing a huge part here. –  hetelek Aug 3 '12 at 2:10
    
If you have OpenSSL question try asking here or on OpenSSL Support, Mailing lists –  Jacob Seleznev Aug 3 '12 at 4:05
1  
@hetelek: Look at the apps/rsa.c source for an example. The function you want is RSA_public_encrypt() and the padding should be RSA_PKCS1_PADDING which is #defined as 1. –  GregS Aug 3 '12 at 22:37
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