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if

list_1 = [(1, 1), (1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 2), (2, 3)]

Consider an element of the tuple as (i, j) Now we know if we know that if we know that if (1, 3) exists then (1,1) and (1,2) should exists if any one of it is missing an error is reported. The error detection should be done one by one first for (1,1) then for (1, 2). similarly if we know that for another sequence if (2,3) exists then similarly (2,1) and (2, 2) would exists.

also this is an example list. The example could also be like:

list_1 = [(1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 2), (2, 3), (3,1) (3,4)] now in this case if (3, 4) exists then (3,1),(3,2) and (3,3) should exists. This pattern can be determined by the max of jth element of each 'i' My code is as gi

for i, e in enumerate(list_1):
              i1 = (1,1)
              if i1 not in list_1:
                 raise ValueError, '%s is missing in %s' %(i1, production)

              if (e[0] == e[1]) and ((e[0],e[1]) not in list_1):
                 #if i1 not in list_1:
                 raise ValueError, '%s is missing in %s' %((e[0], e[1]), production)

              print e, e[0], e[1], (e[0], e[1])
              if i!=len(list_1)-1:


                 if e[0]==list_1[i+1][0] and e[1]!=list_1[i+1][1]-1:

                    raise ValueError, '(%s,%s) is missing in %s ' %(e[0], e[1]+1, production)
share|improve this question
    
Hard work making an assumption of what I think your question (as it's more a 'statement') might be... How about clarifying it with your attempted code up until this point... –  Jon Clements Aug 2 '12 at 23:22
1  
You've asked this question (or trivial variations on it) several times over the past few days. Clearly whatever we're doing isn't helping you very much ;-( so maybe it's time to consider another approach.. I'd suggest working through a tutorial first, so that the answers make more sense to you. –  DSM Aug 2 '12 at 23:25
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/11766802/… –  Sam Mussmann Aug 2 '12 at 23:29
    
possible solutions have been tried however, some errors goes undetected. –  smazon09 Aug 2 '12 at 23:30
    
In that case, I think the more SO-ish way to do things would be to get a working solution on the original question. Working with the people there is probably the best way to figure out how to solve your problem. –  Sam Mussmann Aug 2 '12 at 23:34

2 Answers 2

An itertools-based approach

>>> from itertools import groupby, izip, count
>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> z = [(1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 1), (2, 2), (2, 3), (3,1), (3,4)]
>>> z = sorted(z, key=itemgetter(0))
>>> z = groupby(z, key=itemgetter(0))
>>> bad = []
>>> for key, group in z:
...     z1 = izip((y for (x, y) in group), count(1))
...     for (a, b) in z1:
...             if a != b:
...                    bad.append(key) 
... 
>>> print(set(bad))
set([1, 3])
share|improve this answer
>>> list_1 = [(1, 1), (1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 2), (2, 3)]
>>> check_list = zip(list_1, list_1[1:])
>>> check_list
[((1, 1), (1, 3)), ((1, 3), (1, 4)), ((1, 4), (2, 2)), ((2, 2), (2, 3))]
>>> ok = True
>>> for (i1, j1), (i2, j2) in check_list:
...     if i1 == i2 and j1 + 1 != j2:
...         ok = False
...         break
...     elif i1 + 1 != i2: #you may also want to check j2 == 1:
...         ok = False
...         break
...
>>> ok
False
share|improve this answer
1  
To shorten you can simply do this: for (i1, j1), (i2, j2) in check_list –  jamylak Aug 3 '12 at 0:22
    
thanks, that's cool –  robert king Aug 3 '12 at 0:45

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