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I need help in generating sequence number when group name changes in adjacent rows. I already tried DENSE RANK but it did not work.

Group  ||  Sequence Number 
========================
  A    ||        1     7/1/2012
  A    ||        2     7/2/2012
  A    ||        3     7/2/2012
  B    ||        1     7/3/2012
  B    ||        2     7/3/2012
  B    ||        3     7/3/2012
  A    ||        1     7/4/2012
  A    ||        2     7/5/2012
  A    ||        3     7/5/2012
  C    ||        1
  B    ||        1  
  B    ||        2  
  C    ||        1  
  C    ||        2

Thanks

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Group A occurs twice above, is that right? –  1_CR Aug 2 '12 at 23:43
    
What database are you using? SQL 2012 has some funky features which would help with this, but I'm guessing it's unlikely you're on that version already? –  JohnLBevan Aug 2 '12 at 23:54
    
I am on SQL 2008 R2 –  sri Aug 3 '12 at 0:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a couple of solutions - one simple, one more complex but closer matching your question:

--if you want all As grouped first, then all Bs, etc
select *
, ROW_NUMBER() over (partition by [group] order by id) SequenceNumber
from demo

--if you want the more complex solution where the different groups of As are kept apart from one another
select id
, [group]
, ROW_NUMBER() over (partition by x.p order by x.id) sequenceNumber
from (
    select id
    , [group]
    , (
        select min(b.id)
        from demo b
        where b.[group] <> a.[group]
        and b.id > a.id
    ) p
    from demo a
) x
order by id

Code to setup / run the above sample:

create table demo 
(
    id bigint identity(1,1) not null primary key clustered
    , [group] nchar not null
)
go
insert demo 
select 'A'
union all select 'A'
union all select 'A'
union all select 'B'
union all select 'B'
union all select 'B'
union all select 'C'
union all select 'C'
union all select 'C'
union all select 'A' --in your example you seemed to alow a second group of As separate to the first
union all select 'A' 
union all select 'A' 
union all select 'A' 
union all select 'C'
go
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick response. I think the above is more based on demo table having just the A, B, C groups. What if that demo has many groups. Can the above code be generalized irrespective of group value/number of groups. Thanks again. –  sri Aug 3 '12 at 0:55
    
The above code should work regardless of what values / datatypes you have for your group. I'm not sure how scalable it is / whether it's the best solution though. Can you provide more info on your requirements / what you're trying to fix. Does the solution need to be a single line of SQL, or can we use stored procs / table valued functions? ps. I made a slight tweak to the code to improve performance (changing count(*) to min(b.id)). –  JohnLBevan Aug 3 '12 at 0:58
    
This is awesome, wish I would have thought of it! –  pyrospade Aug 3 '12 at 1:32
    
Thanks pyrospade - though I've now lost hours of sleep trying to come up with something more efficient :/ –  JohnLBevan Aug 3 '12 at 1:57
    
I will try to work it out tomorrow. My scenario is that each row has a date associated with it. As an item moves from group A to group B then to A and so an sequentially, I need to get how many days passed for the item under group A in total. So my plan is - for each set of A get number of days and sum it up to get the total using max-min sequence number under each set. Hope I am clear. –  sri Aug 3 '12 at 3:41

This should work, you can do a while loop.

declare @t table (
    id int identity primary key,
    yourgroup char,
    grouprank int
);
insert into @t (yourgroup)
select yourgroup
from yourtable;
declare @lastgroup char,
        @newrank int,
        @i int = (select MIN(id) from @t),
        @end int = (select MAX(id) from @t);
while @i <= @end begin
    if @lastgroup = (select yourgroup
                     from @t
                     where id = @i) begin
        set @newrank += 1;
    end else begin
        set @newrank = 1;
    end;

    select @lastgroup = yourgroup
    from @t
    where id = @i;

    update @t
    set grouprank = @newrank
    where id = @i;

    set @i += 1;
end;

select * from @t;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. I tried the above solution with a while loop but I am getting the Grouprank as 1 for all the rows? The only thing I changed in the code is in this statement select yourgroup from yourtable; I changed it as select deptname from groups . Is the above code missing any loop or brace statements? –  sri Aug 6 '12 at 19:45
    
I just tested the code and it works for me. What is the data type for deptname and what are some example values? –  pyrospade Aug 6 '12 at 22:11

Sorry for the slow reply to your last comment; I've been at work/away for the start of the weekend. What you're after can be achieved based on my previous answer, but I suspect the code below would be much more efficient / readable. The drawback of the below code is that this does rely on the new SQL 2012 LAG and LEAD features.

You can read up on these features here: http://blog.sqlauthority.com/2011/11/15/sql-server-introduction-to-lead-and-lag-analytic-functions-introduced-in-sql-server-2012/

Info on SQL 2012 licensing here, should you choose to upgrade: http://www.microsoft.com/sqlserver/en/us/get-sql-server/how-to-buy.aspx

Obviously there are many reasons why upgrading may not be justifiable, but thought I'd provide this answer in case it's an option available to you / others looking for this solution:

--Sample Data Setup:

    if object_id('demo') is not null drop table demo
    go
    create table demo 
    (
        id bigint identity(1,1) not null primary key clustered
        , groupId nchar not null
        , startDate date not null constraint uk_demo_startDate unique 
    )
    go
    insert demo 
    select 'A', '2009-01-01'
    union all select 'A', '2009-01-02'
    union all select 'A', '2009-02-01'
    union all select 'B', '2009-03-01'
    union all select 'B', '2009-04-01'
    union all select 'B', '2009-05-01'
    union all select 'C', '2009-06-01'
    union all select 'C', '2009-07-01'
    union all select 'C', '2009-08-01'
    union all select 'A', '2009-09-01'
    union all select 'A', '2009-10-01'
    union all select 'A', '2009-11-01'
    union all select 'A', '2009-12-01'
    union all select 'C', '2010-01-01'
    union all select 'D', '2010-01-02'
    union all select 'D', '2010-01-03'
    union all select 'D', '2010-01-04'
    union all select 'E', '2010-01-05'
    union all select 'E', '2010-01-06'
    union all select 'D', '2010-01-07'
    union all select 'D', '2010-01-08'
    union all select 'E', '2010-01-09'
    union all select 'E', '2010-01-10'
    union all select 'D', '2011-01-01'
    union all select 'D', '2011-01-02'
    union all select 'E', '2012-01-01'
    union all select 'X', '2012-01-02'
    union all select 'D', '2012-01-03'
    go

--Actual Solution
    select *
    , noDays + noDaysAtStatusAtStart noDaysAtStatusAtEnd
    from
    (
        select id
        , groupId
        , startDate
        , noDays 
        ,   case
                when groupId = previousGroupId then lag(noDays,1) over (order by startDate)
                --when previousGroupId is null then 0 --covered by else
                else 0
            end noDaysAtStatusAtStart
        from
        (
            select id
            , startDate
            , groupId
            , endDate
            , previousGroupId
            , dateDiff(day,startDate,endDate) noDays
            from
            (
                select id
                , startDate
                , groupId 
                , lead(startDate,1) over (order by startDate) endDate
                , lag(groupId,1) over (order by startDate) previousGroupId
                from demo
            ) x
        ) y
    ) z
    order by z.startDate
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