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I have a form with multiple check boxes and I want to use javascript to make sure at least one is checked. This is what I have right now but no matter what is chosen an alert pops up.

<html>
<head>
<script language="javascript">
<!---

function valthis()
{


if (document.FC.c1.checked)
{
alert ("thank you for checking a checkbox")
}
else
{
alert ("please check a checkbox")
}


}

-->
</script>
</head>
<body>

Please select at least one Checkbox
<br>
<br>
<form name = "FC">
<input type = "checkbox" name = "c1" value = "c1"> C1 <br>
<input type = "checkbox" name = "c1" value = "c2"> C2 <br>
<input type = "checkbox" name = "c1" value = "c3"> C3 <br>
<input type = "checkbox" name = "c1" value = "c4"> C4 <br>
</form>
<br>
<br>

<input type = "button" value = "Edit and Report" onClick = "valthisform();">
</body>
</html>

what I ended up doing was this

function valthisform()
{
var chkd = document.FC.c1.checked || document.FC.c2.checked|| document.FC.c3.checked|| document.FC.c4.checked

if (chkd == true)
{
}
else
{
alert ("please check a checkbox")
}

}

I decided to drop the Thank you part to fit in with the rest of the assignment. Thank you so much, every ones advice really helped out.

share|improve this question
    
Why is the "Edit and Report" button outside of the form? –  Šime Vidas Aug 3 '12 at 0:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should avoid having two elements with the same names, usually only the first will be picked up by browsers. The same applies for ids. Use classes for similarities between elements.

If you want an easy solution you can use jQuery and do something like:

var checkedAtLeastOne = false;
$('input[type="checkbox"]').each(function() {
    if ($(this).is(":checked")) {
        checkedAtLeastOne = true;
    }
});

If you want to avoid jQuery you can write a longer statement using separate element names with or conditionals, like: if (document.FC.c1.checked || document.FC.c2.checked)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I was looking to avoid the JQuery but your second suggestion helped quite a bit. –  Slythemighty Aug 3 '12 at 3:43
4  
@Mash You should never have two elements with the same names WHAT????? Then how do you write radios? –  Mageek Aug 9 '12 at 4:27

This should work:

function valthisform()
{
    var checkboxs=document.getElementsByName("c1");
    var okay=false;
    for(var i=0,l=checkboxs.length;i<l;i++)
    {
        if(checkboxs[i].checked)
        {
            okay=true;
        }
    }
    if(okay)alert("Thank you for checking a checkbox");
    else alert("Please check a checkbox");
}

If you have a question about the code, just comment.


I use l=checkboxs.length to improve the performance. See http://www.erichynds.com/javascript/javascript-loop-performance-caching-the-length-property-of-an-array/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I was searching on how to validate checkboxes and this worked for me –  user1815823 Apr 6 '13 at 14:24
    
I was forced with this problem, but your code solved my problem +1 –  offboard Oct 5 '13 at 19:12

I have never used javascript but all your checkboxes are named c1.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't worry, it's normal. The id must be unique. –  Mageek Aug 3 '12 at 0:38

Check this.

You can't access form inputs via their name. Use document.getElements methods instead.

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