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I'm trying to declare a constant variable in C++;

        #include <iostream>
        #include <pthread.h>
        #include <stdlib.h>

        using namespace std;

        //
        // declare the mutex
        //
        static pthread_mutex_t mutex    = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

        //
        // AVOID NEGATIVE NUMBERS
        //
        unsigned int MAXSIZE = 0;
        unsigned int head = 0;
        unsigned int tail = 0;  

        //
        // return a empty circular queue
        //
        int* initialize(int size){

           MAXSIZE = size;
           pthread_mutex_lock( &mutex );
           int* queue = new int[ MAXSIZE ];
           // initialize each position to zero ( explicitly )
           for(int i = 0; i < MAXSIZE; i++){
            queue[i] = 0;
           } 

           pthread_mutex_unlock( &mutex );
           return queue;
        }

        //
        // enqueue number into the queue
        // returns the position it was stored
        //
        void* enqueue( void* local_queue, void* local_data ){
           // ASSERT ONLY ONE THREAD EACH  TIME
           pthread_mutex_lock( &mutex );
           // convert back to int
           int data = *((int*)(&local_data));
           int* queue = (int*)local_queue;

           queue[tail] = data;
           tail = (tail+1) % MAXSIZE;

           pthread_mutex_unlock( &mutex );
           cout << "Tail: " << tail << endl;
        }

        //
        // dequeue, given the queue
        //
        void* dequeue( void* queue ){
           int temp;
           pthread_mutex_lock( &mutex );
           int* local_queue = ( int* )queue; 
           temp = local_queue[ head ];
           head = ( head + 1 ) % MAXSIZE;

           pthread_mutex_unlock( &mutex );
           cout << "Removed: " << temp << endl;
    }

    // 
    // print the queue as it is
    //
    void* display( void* local_queue ){
       pthread_mutex_lock( &mutex );
       int* queue = (int*)local_queue;
       if( head == tail ){
        cout << "Queue underflow" << endl;
       }
       else{
        //
        // prints each element in the queue
        //
        for( unsigned int i = head; i < tail; i = (i+1) % MAXSIZE ){
            cout << queue[i] << endl;
        }
       }
       pthread_mutex_unlock( &mutex );
    }

    //
    // delete the memory allocated to the queue
    //
    void remove( int* queue){
       delete queue;
    }

    //
    // explain the user how to run the program
    //
    void usage(){
      cout << "Usage: " << endl; 
      cout << "    ./queue [size] [elements]" << endl;
      cout << "ex: ./queue 5 0 1 2 3 4 5" << endl;
    }

    //
    // main function, the tests are done in the for loop
    //
    int main( int argc, char* argv[] ){

       pthread_t threads[5];

       if(argc < 2){
        cout << "Args must be at least 1 " << endl;
        usage();
        return -1;
       }

       for(size_t j = 0; j < 5; j++){   
        unsigned int size = atoi( argv[1] );
        cout << "Size: " << size << endl;
        int* queue = initialize(size);

        for(size_t i = 2; i < argc; i++){
            enqueue( queue, (void*)atoi( argv[i] ) );
        }
            pthread_create( &threads[j], NULL, dequeue, (void*)queue );
        // make sure memory is freed 
        // finally end the thread
        pthread_join( threads[j], NULL );
        remove(queue);
       }
       return 0;
    }

I would like to have unsigned int MAXSIZE = 0; declared as const unsigned int MAXSIZE; So I could initialize that at runtime. I know it can be done in the constructor of class, however I would like to know whether there is a way to initialize MAXSIZE to size which is given by the user. MAXSIZE is used to implement the circular queue implemented in an array was shown, so it's important to MAXSIZE to be declared as const to avoid being changed and then affect the circular operation of the queue. Thanks. *I hope I clarify my question enough to have a more precise answer. I've added all my code into the question for completeness and for the sake of the community. *

share|improve this question
    
Why not initialize MAXSIZE in the constructor? What happens if someone calls initialize twice? –  Travis Gockel Aug 3 '12 at 1:51
    
@TravisGockel It's just a function, not a constructor. –  philippe Aug 3 '12 at 1:53
1  
So MAXSIZE, queue and mutex are just three global variables? It seems like something better encapsulated as a class. Your initialize function is certainly acquiring a resource and I'm guessing you have some way to destroy said resource. It's your call, but seems like a really obvious use case for a class. –  Travis Gockel Aug 3 '12 at 1:57
    
No need for the mutex in initialize, you haven't exposed anything that could be trampled by another thread. –  Mark Ransom Aug 3 '12 at 2:05
    
Is MAXSIZE a proper const variable or a pre-processor #define constant? –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 3 '12 at 5:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only way you can initialize a const variable at run-time is if it's a member of a class. Then you can use the initialization list of the constructor to set the initial value.

share|improve this answer
    
That would still tie the point of initialization to the point of object definition, which is the very same problem that prompted the original question. –  AndreyT Aug 3 '12 at 1:58
    
@AndreyT, initialize has a strong resemblance to a constructor. This code could be trivially converted into a class. –  Mark Ransom Aug 3 '12 at 2:04
    
Yes, but the problem the OP is struggling with is that he wants to set the constant's value at later time, not at the point of definition. I don't see how class can change anything in this regard. –  AndreyT Aug 3 '12 at 2:17
    
Not totally: int foo(int x) { static const int cx = x; return cx; } –  Travis Gockel Aug 3 '12 at 3:05
    
@TravisGockel, you should propose that as an answer. –  Mark Ransom Aug 3 '12 at 3:45

AFAIK, you can only initialize const variables when you declare them.

In your code, why not just use the argument size?

int* initialize(const unsigned int size){

   pthread_mutex_lock( &mutex );
   // MAXSIZE = size;
   int* queue = new int[ size];
   // initialize each position to zero ( explicitly )
   for(int i = 0; i < size; i++){
        queue[i] = 0;
   }

   pthread_mutex_unlock( &mutex );
   return queue;
}

The whole purpose of passing a const as argument, is to ensure it won't get change inside the function.

share|improve this answer
    
I've updated my question –  philippe Aug 3 '12 at 1:50
    
I still think you're using const the wrong way. I mean, what's the point of setting it to const, if you're trying to change it (even once) why not define it normally, or static, and just don't change it anywhere else. I can't think of a way to change a const only once, maybe what @Mark Ransom said, but I don't know how your code is designed (oop-wise) –  La bla bla Aug 3 '12 at 1:54
    
+1 for you! I've updated my question, so it shows more details on the design. –  philippe Aug 3 '12 at 14:19

If you have to "initialize" a variable at run time, it is not a constant variable. Just make it non-constant and forget about this problem.

share|improve this answer

Just use:

const unsigned int MAXSIZE = 1000;

After the declaration:

extern const unsigned int MAXSIZE;  // THIS is a declaration
const unsigned int MAXSIZE = 1000;

The thing is, const unsigned int MAXSIZE isn't a declaration, but a definition and performs initialization.

share|improve this answer
    
I've updated my question ... –  philippe Aug 3 '12 at 1:46
    
Then there is no way around for that case? –  philippe Aug 3 '12 at 1:48
    
@philippe after the edit, I'm not sure I understand what you mean. Why do you want it to be const if you're changing it at runtime? –  Luchian Grigore Aug 3 '12 at 1:48
    
I updated my question one more time, so you can see the why reason for the MAXSIZE –  philippe Aug 3 '12 at 1:51
    
@philippe: Your update does not show why MAXSIZE should be a constant. Your MAXSIZE looks like an ordinary variable. Why would you suddenly want to make it a const? –  AndreyT Aug 3 '12 at 1:57

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