Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have never encountered this sort of problem in Java before. All this code and the full project may be found at my GitHub. I have a Snowflake class with class hierarchy:

Snowflake extends SolidRectangle extends Movable extends Drawable extends Object

The following two code sections in my Snowflake class produce different graphical results in my game:

//In Snowflake class
public void decay()
{
    age++;
    color = randomSnowflakeColor();
    if(age == 5)
    {
        super.remove();
        Snowflake.Mempool.returnSnowflake(this);
    }
}

and

//In Snowflake class
public void decay()
{
    age++;
    color = randomSnowflakeColor();
    if(age == 5)
    {
        this.remove();
    }

public void remove()
{
    super.remove();
    Snowflake.Mempool.returnSnowflake(this);
}

Neither SolidRectangle nor Movable overrides the remove method, but Drawable does, with the following implementation:

//In Drawable class
public void remove()
{
    game.remove(this);
}

and GameContent game has the following implementation:

//In GameContent class
public synchronized void remove(Drawable drawable)
{
    removeQueue.add(drawable);
}

I will spare you the details of removeQueue, suffice it to say that it is exactly what you expect.

As for Snowflake.Mempool, I know manual memory management isn't usually part of a Java programmer's day, but I found there was too much overhead in creating and garbage collecting these snowflakes, so I thought I would just reuse old snowflakes to avoid this overhead. Please don't get distracted by this. My question is about how the two first code blocks could possibly be different, when they appear to be functionally equivalent.

So, how can the two first code block be producing different results?

share|improve this question
1  
Perhaps the different comes from something else that calls Snowflake.remove(), which has different behavior in these two cases? –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Aug 3 '12 at 3:43
    
Put log in each of you methods so that you can observe which method is being called in which order. –  Rosdi Kasim Aug 3 '12 at 4:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

While the same result is expected when calling decay(), different behaviour of your class may result when remove() is called from elsewhere in the code.

Using your IDE, search for usages of the remove() method and all may be revealed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this! remove is called by the CollisionHandler which recognized it as a SolidRectangle and called it as ((SolidRectangle) snowflake).remove() so it called the Drawable version instead of the Snowflake version of the code. –  nullUser Aug 3 '12 at 3:52
    
Actually this was not the problem... I added a cast and verified that the correct version is being called but I am still getting different behavior. –  nullUser Aug 3 '12 at 4:00

In a comment you said this:

remove is called by the CollisionHandler which recognized it as a SolidRectangle and called it as ((SolidRectangle) snowflake).remove() so it called the Drawable version instead of the Snowflake version of the code.

I don't think this is a correct explanation.

You seem to be saying that this:

Snowflake snowflake = ...
((SolidRectangle) snowflake).remove();

would cause the overridden SolidRectangle.remove() method to be called on the snowflake. That is incorrect. Once the method has been overridden, it cannot be called on a Snowflake except by a Snowflake method (or Snowflake supertype method) calling super.remove().

share|improve this answer
    
You are correct, this was not the problem. –  nullUser Aug 3 '12 at 4:14

I figured it out. The problem was that since Snowflake.Mempool acts as a stack, the most recently destroyed snowflakes are used to make the new snowflakes. I kept all the Drawable elements in an ArrayList<Drawable>. This combination caused certain snowflakes to appear twice in the ArrayList<Drawable> which consequently wrecked my frame adjusting algorithm. Switching to a HashSet<Drawable> resolved the issue.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.