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This question has been asked before but I am facing a slightly different problem.

I have a table which logs events and stores their timestamps (as datetime). I need to be able to break up time into chunks and get number of events that occurred in that interval. The interval can be custom (Say from 5 minutes to 1 hour and even beyond).

The obvious solution is to convert the datetime to unix_timestamp divide it by number of seconds in the interval, take its floor function and multiply it back by the number of seconds. Finally convert the unix_timestamp back to the datetime format.

This works fine for small intervals.

select 
from_unixtime(floor(unix_timestamp(event.timestamp)/300)*300) as start_time,
count(*) as total 
from event 
where timestamp>='2012-08-03 00:00:00' 
group by start_time;

This gives the correct output

+---------------------+-------+
| start_time          | total |
+---------------------+-------+
| 2012-08-03 00:00:00 |    11 |
| 2012-08-03 00:05:00 |     4 |
| 2012-08-03 00:10:00 |     4 |
| 2012-08-03 00:15:00 |     7 |
| 2012-08-03 00:20:00 |     8 |
| 2012-08-03 00:25:00 |     1 |
| 2012-08-03 00:30:00 |     1 |
| 2012-08-03 00:35:00 |     3 |
| 2012-08-03 00:40:00 |     3 |
| 2012-08-03 00:45:00 |     5 |
~~~~~OUTPUT SNIPPED~~~~~~~~~~~~

But if I increase the interval to say 1 hour (3600 sec)

mysql> select from_unixtime(floor(unix_timestamp(event.timestamp)/3600)*3600) as start_time, count(*) as total from event where timestamp>='2012-08-03 00:00:00' group by start_time;
+---------------------+-------+
| start_time          | total |
+---------------------+-------+
| 2012-08-02 23:30:00 |    35 |
| 2012-08-03 00:30:00 |    30 |
| 2012-08-03 01:30:00 |    12 |
| 2012-08-03 02:30:00 |    18 |
| 2012-08-03 03:30:00 |    12 |
| 2012-08-03 04:30:00 |     4 |
| 2012-08-03 05:30:00 |     3 |
| 2012-08-03 06:30:00 |    13 |
| 2012-08-03 07:30:00 |   269 |
| 2012-08-03 08:30:00 |   681 |
| 2012-08-03 09:30:00 |  1523 |
| 2012-08-03 10:30:00 |   911 |
+---------------------+-------+

The reason, as far as I could gauge, for the boundaries not being set properly is that unix_timestamp will convert time from my local timezone (GMT + 0530) to UTC and then output the numerical value.

So a value like 2012-08-03 00:00:00 will actually be 2012-08-02 18:30:00. Dividing and using floor will set the minutes part to 00. But when I use from_unixtime, it will convert it back to GMT + 0530 and hence give me intervals that begin at 30 mins.

How do I ensure the query works correctly irrespective of the timezone? I use MySQL 5.1.52 so to_seconds() is not available

EDIT: The query should also fire correctly irrespective of the interval (can be hours, minutes, days). A generic solution would be appreciated

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use TIMESTAMPDIFF to group by intervals of time:

For a specified interval of hours, you can use:

SELECT   '2012-08-03 00:00:00' + 
         INTERVAL FLOOR(TIMESTAMPDIFF(HOUR, '2012-08-03 00:00:00', timestamp) / <n>) * <n> HOUR AS start_time,
         COUNT(*) AS total 
FROM     event 
WHERE    timestamp >= '2012-08-03 00:00:00'
GROUP BY start_time

Replace the occurances of 2012-08-03 00:00:00 with your minimum input date.

<n> is your specified interval in hours (every 2 hours, 3 hours, etc.), and you can do the same for minutes:

SELECT   '2012-08-03 00:00:00' + 
         INTERVAL FLOOR(TIMESTAMPDIFF(MINUTE, '2012-08-03 00:00:00', timestamp) / <n>) * <n> MINUTE AS start_time,
         COUNT(*) AS total 
FROM     event 
WHERE    timestamp >= '2012-08-03 00:00:00'
GROUP BY start_time

Where <n> is your specified interval in minutes (every 45 minutes, 90 minutes, etc).

Be sure you're passing in your minimum input date (in this example 2012-08-03 00:00:00) as the second parameter to TIMESTAMPDIFF.


EDIT: If you don't want to worry about which interval unit to pick in the TIMESTAMPDIFF function, then of course just do the interval by seconds (300 = 5 minutes, 3600 = 1 hour, 7200 = 2 hours, etc.)

SELECT   '2012-08-03 00:00:00' + 
         INTERVAL FLOOR(TIMESTAMPDIFF(SECOND, '2012-08-03 00:00:00', timestamp) / <n>) * <n> SECOND AS start_time,
         COUNT(*) AS total 
FROM     event 
WHERE    timestamp >= '2012-08-03 00:00:00'
GROUP BY start_time

EDIT2: To address your comment pertaining to reducing the number of areas in the statement where you have to pass in your minimum parameter date, you can use:

SELECT   b.mindate + 
         INTERVAL FLOOR(TIMESTAMPDIFF(SECOND, b.mindate, timestamp) / <n>) * <n> SECOND AS start_time,
         COUNT(*) AS total 
FROM     event 
JOIN     (SELECT '2012-08-03 00:00:00' AS mindate) b ON timestamp >= b.mindate
GROUP BY start_time

And simply pass in your minimum datetime parameter once into the join subselect.

You can even make a second column in the join subselect for your seconds interval (e.g. 3600) and name the column something like secinterval... then change the <n>'s to b.secinterval, so you only have to pass in your minimum date parameter AND interval one time each.


SQLFiddle Demo

share|improve this answer
    
The solution works but passing start_time seems to be a pain –  RedBaron Aug 3 '12 at 6:30
    
Actually even using '1970-01-01 00:00:00' as start_time would work (But UNIX_TIME(0) wouldn't) and that would be static –  RedBaron Aug 3 '12 at 6:37
    
@RedBaron, See EDIT2 which address that. –  Zane Bien Aug 3 '12 at 6:37
    
Yup this works. But I was saying that rather than passng a mindate, we can just set mindate to 0 (acc. to our timezone) and mirror the functionality of to_seconds() fn (provided by 5.5). I'll accept you answer. If you can, please edit and also add a new point about 1970-01-01 00:00:00' being set as mindate and query still working –  RedBaron Aug 3 '12 at 7:19
    
This is one of those issues that only advanced users will need, and therefore, although very well prepared, receive few likes. –  dellasavia Dec 8 '14 at 16:23

the easier method would be:

Method1

select date(timestamp) as date_timestamp, hour(timestamp) as hour_timestamp, count(*) as total 
from event
where timestamp>='2012-08-03 00:00:00' 
group by date_timestamp, hour_timestamp

if you would like to use your original approach.

Method2

select from_unixtime(floor(unix_timestamp(event.timestamp-1800)/3600)*3600+1800) as start_time, 
count(*) as total 
from event 
where timestamp>='2012-08-03 00:00:00' 
group by start_time;

EDIT1

for the first method, it also allows user to set different interval. For example, if user wants the log to group by 15 minutes,

select date(time) as date_timestamp, 
    hour(time) as hour_timestamp,  
    floor(minute(time) as minute_timestamp / 15) * 15 as minute_timestamp
    count(*) as total
from event
group by date_timestamp, hour_timestamp, minute_timestamp
share|improve this answer
    
but you have assumed that Timezone is fixed (For method 2). IF user is in a timezone that does not have 30 minutes difference (e.g .GMT + 0100) the second method would again lead to a skew. And first method does not let me set interval in custom way (Say 90 minutes,15 minutes) –  RedBaron Aug 3 '12 at 5:56
    
For EDIT 1: I would need to check the interval and then ensure that mathematical function is applied to correct component (date,hour,minute,second). I am looking for a generic solution that may allow me to use outlandish intervals (like 90 minutes) –  RedBaron Aug 3 '12 at 6:17

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