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i need to highlight all the occurrences of a string in particular div by selecting a string, once i select a word and click a button it need to highlight all its occurrence inside a div,

eg - if i select

cricket is game

it should highlight all the occurrences of cricket is game some may be like this cricket is game or cricket is game

enter image description here

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How does the user select a string? –  Andrew Aug 3 '12 at 6:26
    
Try this link: gotoquiz.com/web-coding/programming/javascript/… –  keyser Aug 3 '12 at 6:28
    
using mouse drag event (selecting a word or more) –  Samy Aug 3 '12 at 6:29
1  
That is easy, you would have found a lot of snippets for the taks. However, if your question is "How to find and hightlight text across element boundaries?" (non-trivial), ask that specificly. –  Bergi Aug 3 '12 at 6:37
    
ya exactly i want to highlight the word even with nested tags (across element boundaries) –  Samy Aug 3 '12 at 6:45
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7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can get the browser to do the hard work for you using a TextRange in IE and window.find() in other browsers.

This answer shows how to do it. It will match text that crosses element boundaries and does the highlighting for you using document.execCommand().

Alternatively, James Padolsey recently published a script that I haven't used but looks like it could help: http://james.padolsey.com/javascript/replacing-text-in-the-dom-solved/

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this is Great it works fine, as expected, Thanks Tim Down –  Samy Aug 3 '12 at 11:22
    
+1 nice answer, I didn't know you could do this. –  Andrew Aug 3 '12 at 12:28
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This should get you started: http://jsfiddle.net/wDN5M/

function getSelText() {
  var txt = '';
  if (window.getSelection) {
    txt = window.getSelection();
  } else if (document.getSelection) {
        txt = document.getSelection();
  } else if (document.selection) {
    txt = document.selection.createRange().text;
  }
  document.getElementById('mydiv').innerHTML = document.getElementById('mydiv').innerHTML.split(txt).join('<span class="highlight">' + txt + '</span>');
}

See: Get selected text on the page (not in a textarea) with jQuery

If you want it to work across element boundaries your code will need to be more involved than this. jQuery will make your life easier when doing the necessary DOM traversal and manipulation.

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You can tryout this script

Demo

in highlightSearchTerms function of this script var bodyText = document.body.innerHTML; get replace by your divid and than it will do the task for you..

/*
 * This is the function that actually highlights a text string by
 * adding HTML tags before and after all occurrences of the search
 * term. You can pass your own tags if you'd like, or if the
 * highlightStartTag or highlightEndTag parameters are omitted or
 * are empty strings then the default <font> tags will be used.
 */
function doHighlight(bodyText, searchTerm, highlightStartTag, highlightEndTag) 
{
  // the highlightStartTag and highlightEndTag parameters are optional
  if ((!highlightStartTag) || (!highlightEndTag)) {
    highlightStartTag = "<font style='color:blue; background-color:yellow;'>";
    highlightEndTag = "</font>";
  }

  // find all occurences of the search term in the given text,
  // and add some "highlight" tags to them (we're not using a
  // regular expression search, because we want to filter out
  // matches that occur within HTML tags and script blocks, so
  // we have to do a little extra validation)
  var newText = "";
  var i = -1;
  var lcSearchTerm = searchTerm.toLowerCase();
  var lcBodyText = bodyText.toLowerCase();

  while (bodyText.length > 0) {
    i = lcBodyText.indexOf(lcSearchTerm, i+1);
    if (i < 0) {
      newText += bodyText;
      bodyText = "";
    } else {
      // skip anything inside an HTML tag
      if (bodyText.lastIndexOf(">", i) >= bodyText.lastIndexOf("<", i)) {
        // skip anything inside a <script> block
        if (lcBodyText.lastIndexOf("/script>", i) >= lcBodyText.lastIndexOf("<script", i)) {
          newText += bodyText.substring(0, i) + highlightStartTag + bodyText.substr(i, searchTerm.length) + highlightEndTag;
          bodyText = bodyText.substr(i + searchTerm.length);
          lcBodyText = bodyText.toLowerCase();
          i = -1;
        }
      }
    }
  }

  return newText;
}
/*
 * This is sort of a wrapper function to the doHighlight function.
 * It takes the searchText that you pass, optionally splits it into
 * separate words, and transforms the text on the current web page.
 * Only the "searchText" parameter is required; all other parameters
 * are optional and can be omitted.
 */
function highlightSearchTerms(searchText, treatAsPhrase, warnOnFailure, highlightStartTag, highlightEndTag)
{
  // if the treatAsPhrase parameter is true, then we should search for 
  // the entire phrase that was entered; otherwise, we will split the
  // search string so that each word is searched for and highlighted
  // individually
  if (treatAsPhrase) {
    searchArray = [searchText];
  } else {
    searchArray = searchText.split(" ");
  }

  if (!document.body || typeof(document.body.innerHTML) == "undefined") {
    if (warnOnFailure) {
      alert("Sorry, for some reason the text of this page is unavailable. Searching will not work.");
    }
    return false;
  }

  var bodyText = document.body.innerHTML;
  for (var i = 0; i < searchArray.length; i++) {
    bodyText = doHighlight(bodyText, searchArray[i], highlightStartTag, highlightEndTag);
  }

  document.body.innerHTML = bodyText;
  return true;
}

/*
 * This displays a dialog box that allows a user to enter their own
 * search terms to highlight on the page, and then passes the search
 * text or phrase to the highlightSearchTerms function. All parameters
 * are optional.
 */
function searchPrompt(defaultText, treatAsPhrase, textColor, bgColor)
{
  // This function prompts the user for any words that should
  // be highlighted on this web page
  if (!defaultText) {
    defaultText = "";
  }

  // we can optionally use our own highlight tag values
  if ((!textColor) || (!bgColor)) {
    highlightStartTag = "";
    highlightEndTag = "";
  } else {
    highlightStartTag = "<font style='color:" + textColor + "; background-color:" + bgColor + ";'>";
    highlightEndTag = "</font>";
  }

  if (treatAsPhrase) {
    promptText = "Please enter the phrase you'd like to search for:";
  } else {
    promptText = "Please enter the words you'd like to search for, separated by spaces:";
  }

  searchText = prompt(promptText, defaultText);

  if (!searchText)  {
    alert("No search terms were entered. Exiting function.");
    return false;
  }

  return highlightSearchTerms(searchText, treatAsPhrase, true, highlightStartTag, highlightEndTag);
}
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I would use jQuery to iterate over all Elements in your div (Don't know if you have other elements in the div) and then a Regular Expression and do a greedy match to find all occurrences of the selected string in your text(s) in the elements.

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First you need to find needed substrings in needed text and wrap them with <span class="search-highlight">. Every time you need to highlight another strings, you just get all the .search-highlight spans and turn their outerHtml into innerHtml. So the code will be close to:

function highLight(substring, block) {
   $(block).find(".search-highlight").each(function () {
      $(this).outerHtml($(this).html());
   });
   // now the block is free from previous highlights

   $(block).html($(block).html().replace(/substring/g, '<span class="search-highlight">' + substring + '</span>'));
}
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This does something similar to what you want. It highlights all selection matches.

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<form id=f1 name="f1" action="" 
onSubmit="if(this.t1.value!=null && this.t1.value!='')
findString(this.t1.value);return false"
>
<input type="text" id=t1 name=t1size=20>
<input type="submit" name=b1 value="Find">
</form>
<script>
var TRange=null;

function findString (str) {
 if (parseInt(navigator.appVersion)<4) return;
 var strFound;
 if (window.find) {

  // CODE FOR BROWSERS THAT SUPPORT window.find

  strFound=self.find(str);
  if (!strFound) {
   strFound=self.find(str,0,1);
   while (self.find(str,0,1)) continue;
  }
 }
 else if (navigator.appName.indexOf("Microsoft")!=-1) {

  // EXPLORER-SPECIFIC CODE

  if (TRange!=null) {
   TRange.collapse(false);
   strFound=TRange.findText(str);
   if (strFound) TRange.select();
  }
  if (TRange==null || strFound==0) {
   TRange=self.document.body.createTextRange();
   strFound=TRange.findText(str);
   if (strFound) TRange.select();
  }
 }
 else if (navigator.appName=="Opera") {
  alert ("Opera browsers not supported, sorry...")
  return;
 }
 if (!strFound) alert ("String '"+str+"' not found!")
 return;
}
</script>
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