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Well I am trying to build a few small windows applications using MFC and trying to learn how things work, and while drawing a country's flag I got stuck. Following lines of code draw three rectangles and a circle right at the center of middle rectangle, what need to do next is draw spokes in to circle, i.e 8 diameters separated by an angle of 45 degrees.

void CMainWindow::OnPaint (){
CPaintDC dc(this);
for (int i=0;i <=100;i+=50) {
    dc.SetBkMode(TRANSPARENT);
    CRect rect;
    CPen pen(PS_SOLID, 1, RGB(0,0,0));
    CPen *oldPen = dc.SelectObject(&pen);
    if (i == 0){
         CBrush brush(RGB(255,130,0));
         CBrush *oldBrush = dc.SelectObject(&brush);
         dc.Rectangle(75,(i+50),275,(i+100));
    }
    else if(i == 50) {
         CBrush brush(RGB(255,255,255));
         CBrush *oldBrush = dc.SelectObject(&brush);
         dc.Rectangle(75,(i+50),275,(i+100));
         CPen pen2(PS_SOLID, 1,RGB(0,0,255));
         CPen *oldPen = dc.SelectObject(&pen2);
         dc.Ellipse(150,100,200,150);
    }
    else {
         CBrush brush(RGB(34,139,34));
         CBrush *oldBrush = dc.SelectObject(&brush);
         dc.Rectangle(75,(i+50),275,(i+100));
    }
}

I have no clue how to do that, I tried to find it in the MFC library but no luck!

share|improve this question
    
As no one else has mentioned it, you can calculate the end points of the line using normal Sin/Cos functions multiplying the results by the diameter to give you the coordinates relative to the center point. I odn't do C++ so I can't give you an example. –  Deanna Aug 3 '12 at 9:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is an example of the sin() cos() method. I didn't see the point of putting the whole code block in a for loop, show I removed that part.

#include "math.h"
#define PI 3.1415926535898
void DrawIndiaFlag(CDC & dc , int x, int y)
{
    dc.SetBkMode(TRANSPARENT); 
    CRect rect; 
    CPen pen(PS_SOLID, 1, RGB(0,0,0)); 
    CPen *oldPen = dc.SelectObject(&pen); 

    {
        CBrush brush(RGB(255,130,0)); 
        CBrush *oldBrush = dc.SelectObject(&brush); 
        dc.Rectangle(x,(y),x+200,(y+50)); 
        dc.SelectObject(oldBrush);
    }

    {
        CBrush brush(RGB(255,255,255)); 
        CBrush *oldBrush = dc.SelectObject(&brush); 
        dc.Rectangle(x,(50+y),x+200,(y+100)); 
        CPen pen2(PS_SOLID, 1,RGB(0,0,255)); 
        CPen *oldPen = dc.SelectObject(&pen2); 
        dc.Ellipse(x+75,y+50,x+125,y+100); 

        // Draw spokes
        int nOriginX = x+100;
        int nOriginY = y+75;
        int nRadius = 25;
        int nSpokes = 24;
        double fAngle = 2*PI/nSpokes;

        for (int i =0; i<nSpokes; i++)
        {
            dc.MoveTo(nOriginX,nOriginY);
            int nX = (int)ceil(cos((fAngle)*i)*(nRadius)+nOriginX);
            int nY = (int)ceil(sin((fAngle)*i)*(nRadius)+nOriginY);
            dc.LineTo(nX,nY);
        }
        dc.SelectObject(oldPen);

    }

    {
        CBrush brush(RGB(34,139,34)); 
        CBrush *oldBrush = dc.SelectObject(&brush); 
        dc.Rectangle(x,(100+y),x+200,(150+y)); 
        dc.SelectObject(oldBrush);
    }

    dc.SelectObject(oldPen);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks! I was actually done with my problem but your solution seems to be more robust and flexible. –  vin Aug 6 '12 at 5:50

I'm not familiar with the API your are using, but you could;

  • start with a thin rectangle (assuming there is no line function) as your line
  • draw it from the centre of the circle to the top, this should be an easy co-ordinate to work out
  • take those starting positions from your first line and rotate them around the centre of the circle, if their is no API function for this you could do it manually as described here http://www.euclideanspace.com/maths/geometry/affine/aroundPoint/index.htm
  • Use these new rotated co-ordinates to draw your next line, then just repeat
share|improve this answer

I think what you're after is the CDC::LineTo method (you can use CDC::MoveTo to get to the start point). More info:

"Draws a line from the current position up to, but not including, the point specified by x and y (or point)... The line is drawn with the selected pen. The current position is set to x, y or to point."

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