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I have to write C code for reading large files. The code is below:

int read_from_file_open(char *filename,long size)
{
    long read1=0;
    int result=1;
    int fd;
    int check=0;
    long *buffer=(long*) malloc(size * sizeof(int));
    fd = open(filename, O_RDONLY|O_LARGEFILE);
    if (fd == -1)
    {
       printf("\nFile Open Unsuccessful\n");
       exit (0);;
    }
    long chunk=0;
    lseek(fd,0,SEEK_SET);
    printf("\nCurrent Position%d\n",lseek(fd,size,SEEK_SET));
    while ( chunk < size )
    {
        printf ("the size of chunk read is  %d\n",chunk);
        if ( read(fd,buffer,1048576) == -1 )
        {
            result=0;
        }
        if (result == 0)
        {
            printf("\nRead Unsuccessful\n");
            close(fd);
            return(result);
        }

        chunk=chunk+1048576;
        lseek(fd,chunk,SEEK_SET);
        free(buffer);
    }

    printf("\nRead Successful\n");

    close(fd);
    return(result);
}

The issue I am facing here is that as long as the argument passed (size parameter) is less than 264000000 bytes, it seems to be able to read. I am getting the increasing sizes of the chunk variable with each cycle.

When I pass 264000000 bytes or more, the read fails, i.e.: according to the check used read returns -1.

Can anyone point me to why this is happening? I am compiling using cc in normal mode, not using DD64.

share|improve this question
    
Which operating system? – Dietrich Epp Aug 3 '12 at 7:02
    
possible duplicate for stackoverflow.com/questions/3825896/… – CyberDem0n Aug 3 '12 at 7:03
1  
There are some serious problems with your code that I can see. First of all you allocate a buffer to read into, using size as the size. Then you read info the buffer, using a fixed size disregarding the allocated size of the buffer you read into. Think about what will happen if size is less than 250k. Second, as the file is newly open you do not need to seek to the beginning. Third, you then seek to size, but is size the number of records in the file or a number of bytes? You use size differently when allocating the buffer. – Joachim Pileborg Aug 3 '12 at 7:14
    
Fourth, you free the buffer inside the loop, but do not allocate a new one. This means that on the second iteration it will read into unallocated memory. Fifth, calling read will automatically advance the position in the file, you do not need to seek every time. Sixth, when you read you check for error, but not for end-of-file. read returns 0 on end-of-file. – Joachim Pileborg Aug 3 '12 at 7:16
1  
And finally, you shouldn't really be using read when reading from a large file. Using e.g. mmap is probably a more effective solution, especially if you are reading the file sequentially. – Joachim Pileborg Aug 3 '12 at 7:20

In the first place, why do you need lseek() in your cycle? read() will advance cursor in file by the number of byes read.

And, to the topic: long, and, respectively, chunk, will have maximum value of 2147483647, any greater number will become negative, actually.

You want to use off_t to declare chunk: off_t chunk, and size as size_t. That's the main reason why lseek() fails.

And, then again, as other people noticed, you do not want to free() your buffer inside the cycle.

Note also that you will overwrite the data you have already read. Additionally, read() will not necessarily read as much as you have asked it, so it is better to advance chunk by the amount of the bytes actually read, rather than amount of bytes you want to read.

Taking everything in regards, the correct code probably shall look something like that:

// Edited: note comments after the code
#ifndef O_LARGEFILE
#define O_LARGEFILE 0
#endif

int read_from_file_open(char *filename,size_t size)
{
int fd;
long *buffer=(long*) malloc(size * sizeof(long));
fd = open(filename, O_RDONLY|O_LARGEFILE);
   if (fd == -1)
    {
       printf("\nFile Open Unsuccessful\n");
       exit (0);;
    }
off_t chunk=0;
lseek(fd,0,SEEK_SET);
printf("\nCurrent Position%d\n",lseek(fd,size,SEEK_SET));
while ( chunk < size )
  {
   printf ("the size of chunk read is  %d\n",chunk);
   size_t readnow;
   readnow=read(fd,((char *)buffer)+chunk,1048576);
   if (readnow < 0 )
     {
        printf("\nRead Unsuccessful\n");
        free (buffer);
        close (fd);
        return 0;
     }

   chunk=chunk+readnow;
  }

printf("\nRead Successful\n");

free(buffer);
close(fd);
return 1;

}

I also took a liberty of removing result variable and all related logic, since, I believe, it can be simplified.

Edit: I have noted that some systems (most notably, BSD) do not have O_LARGEFILE, since it is not needed there. So, I have added an #ifdef in the beginning, which would make code more portable.

share|improve this answer

The lseek function may have difficulty in supporting big file sizes. Try using lseek64

Please check the link to see the associated macros which needs to be defined when you use lseek64 function.

share|improve this answer

If its 32 bit machine, it will cause some problem for reading a file of larger than 4gb. So if you are using gcc compiler try to use the macro -D_LARGEFILE_SOURCE=1 and -D_FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64.

Please check this link also

If you are using any other compiler check for similar types of compiler option.

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