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I want to use the JsonWriter to create a representation of a custom object, the problem is that I can't find the namespace in which the JsonWriter Class resides, is it an external library or already embedded in the .netFramework? I am using Microsoft Visual Studio 2010, and the project is a Windows Communication Service using .net 4.0

Thanks in advance

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"The" JsonWriter? A web search reveals several such classes - do you have any idea which one you mean? –  Jon Skeet Aug 3 '12 at 7:50
    
I am trying to follow the example in stackoverflow.com/questions/7327853/… –  Hassan Mokdad Aug 3 '12 at 7:52
    
So the clue's in the title: Json.NET. Do a web search for that... –  Jon Skeet Aug 3 '12 at 7:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could install the JSON.NET NuGet:

Install-Package Newtonsoft.Json

The JsonWriter class is defined in the Newtonsoft.Json assembly that will automatically be added to your project when you install the NuGet. Or you could also manually download and reference this assembly to your project.

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Given the post you've referred to, it looks like you're after Json.NET (NuGet package, documentation).

Once you've got as far as installing that, you should be aware that you don't have to use JsonWriter directly - that's a relatively low level API. I've used Json.NET in a few projects, and never had to go that low - the "LINQ to JSON" API is a better fit in most cases, in my experience.

It's a bit like the XML APIs - you can use XmlWriter and XmlReader, but it's usually simpler to use a DOM representation such as LINQ to XML.

Also note that if you don't want an external dependency, you can use DataContractJsonSerializer which is built into .NET.

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