Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While browsing the code of my application I faced this:

private string[] ReadFromFile(string path)
{
    string[] data = null;
    try
    {
        data = File.ReadAllLines(path);
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        throw new Exception("The file is not correct");
    }

    return data;
}

Ok so I know this code is not good and I was about to refactor this. However, this code is used in the definition of some tests for FitNesse. This code is never used in production. The parameter given in this method is supposed to be always correct. So I feel like removing the whole try/catch block and let it crash if it should. FitNesse would give us the whole details about the exception thrown, but since it's a test fixture I'm wondering if it may be ok.

File.ReadAllLines can throw a dozen of different exceptions.

So my question: Is it acceptable to have such kind of code, outside production, even if used to test production code, and in a environment under control? Or is it bad under any circumstances?

share|improve this question
    
I do not know fitnesse, but if it catches and logs the actual exception i wouldn't throw (redefine) a new exception –  Luis Filipe Aug 3 '12 at 8:15
4  
If you really want to throw your own exception, pass the original exception as inner exception. This will be really helpful for finding the real error... –  ZombieHunter Aug 3 '12 at 8:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is even worse to have such code in unit tests than having it in production code. In production code sometimes it might make a sense to hide some exception details (though they still should be delivered via InnerException for example) but in unit tests you should always see as much as possible because they are done for you (developer, not end user). So I think this entire try/catch block should be removed.

Also if in some other case you would like to fail test then I would recommend using Assert.Fail("message") construction since it makes it more clear then tests should be treated as failed if it reached this point. Not sure whether it can be applied to FitNesse though.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed. Do not have such code anywhere, let alone in a Unit Test! –  Matthew Watson Aug 3 '12 at 8:22
1  
Well FitNesse is more about functionnal testing than unit testing. For a unit test I wouldn't have hesitated. In my case it's not this feature that is tested but this feature is used in a test (the actual test is about verifying some processing of the data retrieved with this method) –  Guillaume Aug 3 '12 at 8:40

I would catch it, and then throw a streamlined exception that will leverage the functionality of FitNesse

private string[] ReadFromFile(string path)
{
    string[] data = null;
    try
    {
        data = File.ReadAllLines(path);
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        throw new Exception("message:<<Problem reading in file: " +e.getMessage() + ">>");
    }

    return data;
}

If you do this, the error message will appear in context and be easier to identify. Unfortunately, an unwrapped exception will appear in a exception block separate from the fixture that had the problem. The e.printStackTrace() will give you information on the output page that can give you more details.

I agree with others that in unit test code you want the exception to occur in context of the code. However your audience is different when in a unit test. The people working with it should always be developers. In the case of FitNesse tests, you are working with BAs and Testers, who may benefit from a little extra diagnostics.

The code I added is Java, and I know this is a c# test, but the spirit is the same and the "message:<< exception" should work the same in FitSharp for slim. I work in Java and ruby, so my c# is really weak.

share|improve this answer

If you catch exception you should do something with it, write logs e.g. If you only throw your own exception you lose stack trace of a last exception.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.