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I have a C# application that receives UDP data from a remote host. I find that sometimes my socket receives nothing and I cant seem to find any clues as to why! Wireshark tells me my data is being sent from the remote device correctly. I cant seem to get why sometimes I can receive fine, and sometimes I can't.

I don't get any exceptions, but OnRecieve never gets called

Here is my code in case it helps:

class cUdpRx
{
    private Thread rxThread = null;
    private Socket UdpSocket;
    private IPEndPoint localEp;
    byte[] byData;
    //rxbytes event
    public delegate void OnRxBytesEventHandler(byte[] rxBuf);
    public event OnRxBytesEventHandler OnRxBytesEvent;



    /// <summary>
    /// Creates the udp socket
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="Port"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public bool CreateSocket(int Port)
    {
        try
        {
            byData = new byte[1500]; //create our buffer
            UdpSocket = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Dgram, ProtocolType.Udp);
            UdpSocket.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Socket, SocketOptionName.ReuseAddress, true);
            localEp = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any,Port);
            UdpSocket.Bind(localEp);
            UdpSocket.BeginReceive(byData,0,byData.Length, SocketFlags.None, new AsyncCallback(OnRecieve), UdpSocket);

            return true;    //seemed to work ok
        }
        catch
        {
            Dispose();
            return false;   //something went wrong, abort
        }
    }

    private void OnRecieve(IAsyncResult iar)
    {
        byte[] rxData;
        int nBytesRec = 0;
        Socket socket = (Socket)iar.AsyncState;
        try //in case something else has already disposed of the socket
        {
            nBytesRec = socket.EndReceive(iar);
        }
        catch
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("cant access udp rx socket");
        }
        try
        {
            if (nBytesRec > 0)
            {
                rxData = new byte[nBytesRec];
                Array.Copy(byData, rxData, nBytesRec); //copy exact data into new array
                OnRxBytesEvent(rxData);
            }
            if(!killThreads)
                UdpSocket.BeginReceive(byData, 0, byData.Length, SocketFlags.None, new AsyncCallback(OnRecieve), UdpSocket);
        }
        catch(SocketException se)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(se.ToString());
        }
    }

Any help would be really appreciated as its stopping me from going forward with my project. Thanks

UPDATE It seems like using IPAdress.any is the problem. If I change:

localEp = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any,Port);

to

localEp = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse("192.168.0.33"),Port);

where 192.168.0.33 is the IP address of my computer, it receives data every time. Can anyone explain why? It is quite useful to use IPAddress.any and receive from both wireless and wired connections. IPAddress.any is equivalent to 0.0.0.0 and according to MSDN it should receive on all network interfaces.

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2  
You know that UDP does not guarantee that packets arrive like TCP does? You might be seeing the effects of a shaky connection. –  Dervall Aug 3 '12 at 9:04
1  
I know but if wireshark is seeing the packets, it at least means that the NIC is recieving them. I either recieve data fine, or none at all. I also want to add that my use of two try/catch in OnRecieve might seem odd but I was debuging something at the time so try to ignore it. –  gcb Aug 3 '12 at 9:08

1 Answer 1

The usual cause of such problems is not processing packets fast enough. They fill up socket receive buffer and kernel starts dropping them.

Increase socket receive buffer size to accommodate traffic bursts. Remove everything non-essential from the fast socket reading path. Consider simple iterative approach bellow instead of working against thread pool:

rxData = new byte[nBytesRec];

while ( !time_to_stop ) {
    int len = socket.Receive( rxData );
    OnRxBytesEvent( rxData, len );
}

Your code comments mention multicast. Note that you need to add explicit group membership for that, and the fact that you join a multicast group on an interface (either explicitly or as decided via routing table), so if you want to listen for multicast data on two interfaces you need two sockets.

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1  
I have some flow control in my network protocol so overfilling the receive buffer is not possible. Mention of multi casting is due to copying code from elsewhere -my bad. The issue seems to be with using Ipadress.any –  gcb Aug 3 '12 at 18:06
    
Flow control, oh my ... "not possible" is a rather strong statement. Re-check your assumptions. INADDR_ANY has probably nothing to do with the real problem. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Aug 3 '12 at 18:23
    
I am not making any assumptions. When I bind to the IP address of the computer instead of using IPAddress.Any it works. Also, I can see what is happening on wireshark - as I said in my original question. –  gcb Aug 3 '12 at 20:46
    
Do simple tests - send packets with netcat (not you app) over wireless and wired network. Do they arrive? With or without IPAddress.Any? Try with and without async stuff. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Aug 3 '12 at 20:57
    
The remote station is actually an embedded platform with an ARM Cortex processor in it which sends the UDP packets. I will try sending with Netcap but i'm not sure if it will help. –  gcb Aug 6 '12 at 8:46

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