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I have a data.table table with about 2.5 million rows. There are two columns. I want to remove any rows that are duplicated in both columns. Previously for a data.frame I would have done this: df -> unique(df[,c('V1', 'V2')]) but this doesn't work with data.table. I have tried unique(df[,c(V1,V2), with=FALSE]) but it seems to still only operate on the key of the data.table and not the whole row.

Any suggestions?

Cheers, Davy

Example

>dt
      V1   V2
[1,]  A    B
[2,]  A    C
[3,]  A    D
[4,]  A    B
[5,]  B    A
[6,]  C    D
[7,]  C    D
[8,]  E    F
[9,]  G    G
[10,] A    B

in the above data.table where V2 is the table key, only rows 4,7, and 10 would be removed.

> dput(dt)
structure(list(V1 = c("B", "A", "A", "A", "A", "A", "C", "C", 
"E", "G"), V2 = c("A", "B", "B", "B", "C", "D", "D", "D", "F", 
"G")), .Names = c("V1", "V2"), row.names = c(NA, -10L), class = c("data.table", 
"data.frame"), .internal.selfref = <pointer: 0x7fb4c4804578>, sorted = "V2")
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Perhaps if you made a reproducible example that demonstrates your question / problem, people would find it easier to answer. –  Andrie Aug 3 '12 at 9:17
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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

From ?unique.data.table, it is clear that calling unique on a data table only works on the key. This means you have to reset the key to all columns before calling unique.

library(data.table)
dt <- data.table(
  V1=LETTERS[c(1,1,1,1,2,3,3,5,7,1)],
  V2=LETTERS[c(2,3,4,2,1,4,4,6,7,2)]
)

Calling unique with one column as key:

setkey(dt, "V2")
unique(dt)
     V1 V2
[1,]  B  A
[2,]  A  B
[3,]  A  C
[4,]  A  D
[5,]  E  F
[6,]  G  G

Reset the key to all columns, then call unique:

setkey(dt)
unique(dt)
     V1 V2
[1,]  A  B
[2,]  A  C
[3,]  A  D
[4,]  B  A
[5,]  C  D
[6,]  E  F
[7,]  G  G

Edit from Matthew :

Or, instead of setting the key to all columns which might take some time for large tables of many rows and many columns, removing the key achieves the same result :

setkey(dt,NULL)
unique(dt)
   V1 V2
1:  A  B
2:  A  C
3:  A  D
4:  B  A
5:  C  D
6:  E  F
7:  G  G
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This only works if no key has been set. I'll edit the question above to make that clear. Sorry –  Davy Kavanagh Aug 3 '12 at 9:12
    
@DavyKavanagh Answer edited –  Andrie Aug 3 '12 at 9:26
    
Excellent. Thank you! –  Davy Kavanagh Aug 3 '12 at 9:30
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unique(df) works on your example.

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With your example data.table...

> dt<-data.table(V1 = c("B", "A", "A", "A", "A", "A", "C", "C", "E", "G"), V2 = c("A", "B", "B", "B", "C", "D", "D", "D", "F", "G"))
> setkey(dt,V2)

Consider the following tests:

> haskey(dt) # obviously dt has a key, since we just set it
[1] TRUE

> haskey(dt[,list(V1,V2)]) # ... but this is treated like a "new" table, and does not have a key
[1] FALSE

> haskey(dt[,.SD]) # note that this still has a key
[1] TRUE

So, you can list the columns of the table and then take the unique() of that, with no need for setting the key to all columns or dropping it (by setting it to NULL) as required by the solution from @Andrie (and edited by @MatthewDowle). The solutions suggested by @Pop and @Rahul didn't work for me.

See Try 3 below, which is very similar to your initial try. Your example was not clear so I'm not sure why it didn't work. Also it was a few months ago when you posted the question, so maybe data.table was updated?

> unique(dt) # Try 1: wrong answer (missing V1=C and V2=D)
   V1 V2
1:  B  A
2:  A  B
3:  A  C
4:  A  D
5:  E  F
6:  G  G

> dt[!duplicated(dt)] # Try 2: wrong answer (missing V1=C and V2=D)
   V1 V2
1:  B  A
2:  A  B
3:  A  C
4:  A  D
5:  E  F
6:  G  G

> unique(dt[,list(V1,V2)]) # Try 3: correct answer; does not require modifying key
   V1 V2
1:  B  A
2:  A  B
3:  A  C
4:  A  D
5:  C  D
6:  E  F
7:  G  G

> setkey(dt,NULL)
> unique(dt) # Try 4: correct answer; requires key to be removed
   V1 V2
1:  B  A
2:  A  B
3:  A  C
4:  A  D
5:  C  D
6:  E  F
7:  G  G
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1  
Maybe a new unique(...,use.key=FALSE) argument would help; now filed as FR#2483. –  Matt Dowle Jan 18 '13 at 0:23
    
Hi @MatthewDowle. Yes, that would be a nice convenience. I think your comment in the FR is also correct--if the key is unique then use.key=FALSE could be ignored. –  dnlbrky Jan 18 '13 at 14:12
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Or simply dt[!duplicated(dt)] that will return the same output as in Andrie"s post.

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1  
It doesn't seem to for me. ?duplicated.data.table is similar to ?unique.data.table in that the key will be used if present. So you still need to set the key to all columns as Andrie did, or remove the key, for it to work as OP wants. And unique(dt) seems simpler than dt[!duplicated(dt)], iiuc. –  Matt Dowle Aug 9 '12 at 13:47
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