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I am looking to call a onclick function forcefully.

$('.checkbox-selector').click(function() {

});

$('.checkbox-selector1').click(function() {

});

When a control goes to the first function, the second function should be called automatically i.e. onlick event is triggered.

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1  
Just as an aside, you can block your code with four spaces, as opposed to back ticks, for syntax highlighting. –  Daedalus Aug 3 '12 at 9:30
1  
Did you use the search before you asked this question? –  Felix Kling Aug 3 '12 at 9:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Not sure what it is exactly you're looking for, but I'd guess:

$('.checkbox-selector').click(function() {
    /* all sorts of stuff*/
    $('.checkbox-selector1').click();
    //or:
    $('.checkbox-selector1').trigger('click');
});

$('.checkbox-selector1').click(function() {

});

Something like that?

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function func1(e) {
    // do stuff for selector

    // run func2 too!
    func2();
}

function func2(e) {
    // do stuff for selector1
}

$('.checkbox-selector').click(func1);
$('.checkbox-selector1').click(func2);

Is this what you mean?


If so, make sure to look at the comments! They contain quite valuable information considering events and such.

You can replace func2(); with $('.checkbox-selector1').trigger('click'); to trigger the native event handler too! Using $('.checkbox-selector1').triggerHandler('click'); is practically the same as func2();, whichever you prefer.

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This is much better solution seeing as .trigger("click") will call the native .click() method on the element which could have other side effects. See what I mean here: jsfiddle.net/8Kfmd/1 . In chrome the second checkbox gets checked as a result of what I just explaind. –  Esailija Aug 3 '12 at 9:37
    
@Esailija, It's not a (negative) side effect if you ask me. It entirely depends on the project but if you want to mimic a user click having a checkbox actually checked is 100% correct imo.(that aside, writing clean functions for this is often nicer) –  René Aug 3 '12 at 9:47
    
Well the op didn't mention anything about needing to check the checkbox, just calling another function where .trigger is inappropriate. –  Esailija Aug 3 '12 at 9:48
1  
I have to admit, I miss read that part at first. But without knowing the full context of the code trigger can still be a good option.(+1 on this answer from me too because of how it often should be coded) –  René Aug 3 '12 at 9:54
1  
@Esailija: If you only wanted to call event handers bound by jQuery, you could use .triggerHandler: api.jquery.com/triggerHandler. –  Felix Kling Aug 3 '12 at 10:18

Take a look at the jQuery trigger function

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