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Consider a document in the following format:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<body>
   <div class="blog_post_item first">
       <?php // some child elements ?>
   </div><!-- end blog_post_item -->
</body>
</html>

I am loading a document like this from one domain to another with PHP cURL. I would like to trim my cURL result to only include div.blog_post_item.first and its children. I know the structure of the other page, yet I can't edit it. I imagine I can use preg_match to find the opening and closing tags; they will always look the same, including that ending comment.

I have searched for examples/tutorials of screen scraping with cURL/XPath/XSLT/whatever, and its mostly a cyclical rattling off of names of HTML parsing libraries. For that reason, please provide a simple working example. Please do not simply explain that parsing HTML with regex is a potential security vulnerability. Please do not just list libraries and specifications that I should read further into.

I have some simple PHP cURL code:

$ch = curl_init("http://a.web.page.com");
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_HEADER, 0);
$output = curl_exec($ch);
curl_close($ch);

Of course, now $output contains the entire source. How will I get just the contents of that element?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are sure about the following structure:

<div class="blog_post_item first">
   WHATEVER
</div><!-- end blog_post_item -->

AND you are sure the ending-code doesn't appear in WHATEVER, then you can simply grab it.

(Note please that I replaced your original PHP with WHATEVER. CURL will only fetch the HTML, and it will contain content, not PHP.)

You don't need a regex. You can also do it simply by searching for the wanted strings, like in my example below.

$curlResponse = '
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<body>
   <div class="blog_post_item first">
       <?php // some child elements ?>
   </div><!-- end blog_post_item -->
</body>
</html>';

$startStr = '<div class="blog_post_item first">';
$endStr = '</div><!-- end blog_post_item -->';

$startStrPos = strpos($curlResponse, $startStr)+strlen($startStr);
$endStrPos = strpos($curlResponse, $endStr);

$wanted = substr($curlResponse, $startStrPos, $endStrPos-$startStrPos );

echo htmlentities($wanted);
share|improve this answer
    
This is very simple to understand. I like it! Thanks! –  Jezen Thomas Aug 3 '12 at 10:20

This piece of code should work (>= 5.3.6 and dom extension):

$s = <<<EOM
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<body>
   <div class="blog_post_item first">
       <?php // some child elements ?>
   </div><!-- end blog_post_item -->
</body>
</html>
EOM;

$d = new DOMDocument;
$d->loadHTML($s);

$x = new DOMXPath($d);

foreach ($x->query('//div[contains(@class, "blog_post_item") and contains(@class, "first")]') as $el) {
        echo $d->saveHTML($el);
}
share|improve this answer
    
ext DOM is the right way to go. Personally I'd use cURL to grab the target url output and cache it in one operation, then analyse it as @Jack explains in another. I.e. isolate the various latency problems associated with url grabbing (server down, timeouts, line problems etc) –  Cups Aug 3 '12 at 10:19
    
Sadly, it threw me a bunch of warnings. –  Jezen Thomas Aug 3 '12 at 10:24
    
@JezenThomas those warnings can be silenced by using libxml_use_internal_errors(true). –  Ja͢ck Aug 3 '12 at 13:07

That's quite easy if you are sure the begin and end is ALWAYS the same. All you have to do is search for the beginning and end and match everything between that. I think a lot of people will be pissed at me for using regex to find a bit of HTML but it'll do the job!

// cURL
$ch = curl_init("http://a.web.page.com");
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
$output = curl_exec($ch);
curl_close($ch);

if(empty($output)) exit('Couldn\'t download the page');

// finding your data
$pattern = '/<div class="blog_post_item first">(.*?)<\/div><!-- end blog_post_item -->/';

preg_match_all($pattern, $output, $matches);
var_dump($matches); // all matches

Because I don't know which website you're trying to crawl I'm not sure if this works or not.


After searching for quite a while (26 minutes to be exact) I have found why it didn't work. The dot (.) doesn't match newlines. Because HTML is full of new lines, it couldn't match the contents. Using a slightly dirty hack I managed to get it matching anyway (even though you already picked an answer).

// cURL
$ch = curl_init('http://blogg.oscarclothilde.com/');
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
$output = curl_exec($ch);
curl_close($ch);

if(empty($output)) exit('Couldn\'t download the page');

// finding your data
$pattern = '/<div class="blog_post_item first">(([^.]|.)*?)<\/div><!-- end blog_post_item -->/';

preg_match_all($pattern, $output, $matches);
var_dump($matches[1][0]); // all matches
share|improve this answer
    
It's a good start, but var_dump($matches); is giving me array(2) { [0]=> array(0) { } [1]=> array(0) { } } –  Jezen Thomas Aug 3 '12 at 9:53
    
can I get an URL so I can give it a go myself? "a.web.page.com" clearly doesn't exist. Also, I added an extra check to see if you got a response in the first place. –  Tim S. Aug 3 '12 at 9:54
    
I don't want to link to the site in public. I had a look at your site, but couldn't find contact information. You could email me and I can return the URL. –  Jezen Thomas Aug 3 '12 at 9:58
    
@JezenThomas used the contact form on your website –  Tim S. Aug 3 '12 at 10:00
    
+1 is the best I can do. Shame I can't mark two answers as correct! –  Jezen Thomas Aug 3 '12 at 12:29

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