Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Actually when i open the terminal i got this default string:
username@hostname:~

I want to replace the above string whit this one:
<myprgrogram>:~

How can i do this?
I'm developing in C on GNU/Linux).
Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Is <myprgrogram> the current path? –  xdazz Aug 3 '12 at 9:45
    
What is <myprgrogram> ? –  Brian Agnew Aug 3 '12 at 9:45
    
no no <myprogram> is the program's name! –  polslinux Aug 3 '12 at 9:49
1  
@polslinux - which program name ? If it's the program that's running then you won't have a prompt whilst it's running (unless you background it) –  Brian Agnew Aug 3 '12 at 9:51
    
What is the relation between your problem and programming in C? The string you see when you log in (open the terminal) is the shell prompt. –  Henk Langeveld Aug 3 '12 at 15:25

3 Answers 3

You need to set up your prompt as detailed here (I'm assuming you're using bash).

There are numerous options and capabilities. See here for a gallery of examples.

share|improve this answer
    
Something like: system("PS1='[myprogram:$]\'"); –  polslinux Aug 3 '12 at 9:47

If you mean current path, then add the below line to your .bashrc file.

export PS1='<$PWD>:'
share|improve this answer
    
i mean that when the C program will start its execution it has to change the PS1 from username@hostame to <program_name> :) –  polslinux Aug 3 '12 at 9:52
1  
And when the C program starts, the shell is suspended until your program completes. Your program and the shell are two separate processes, and neither can change data in the other's memory. –  Henk Langeveld Aug 3 '12 at 15:32

You can change an environmental variable using setenv/putenv from the standard library (stdlib.h), see "man setenv". However, when the program ends the variable won't be saved.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.