Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Very new to Rails, have managed a few simple projects, but now stepping into more complex associations between tables and was hoping for some help.

The scenario can best be related to a sports match. Let's say we have

1) A Team (has_many players)

2) A Player (belongs_to team)

3) A Match -- now it gets tricky.

A Match will have: 2 teams, and 22 players (11 on each side) that take part in it. Also, associated with each player, will be their scores for the match (for example, Shots on goal, Goals scored, Points, etc.)

What would be the best practice to create this kind of association? Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
This is a rather complicated problem. It also depends on how you will be using (querying) your data, which you haven't described. So it's kind of hard to answer this question. –  Mischa Aug 3 '12 at 10:33
    
I wasn't exactly sure how I should be querying the data. I figure I will add the "date played" as well as the "venue" to each match. That should be enough to pull matches (i.e. Show all matches played on Sept-27th-2012). –  Kopty Aug 3 '12 at 15:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Models

app/models/team.rb

class Team < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_many :players, inverse_of: :team
    has_many :team_matches
    has_many :matches, through: :team_matches
end

app/models/player.rb

class Player < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :team, inverse_of: :player
    has_many :player_matches
    has_many :matches, through: :player_matches
end

app/models/match.rb

class Match < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_many :players, through: :player_matches
    has_many :teams, through: :team_matches
end

app/models/team_match.rb

class TeamMatch < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :team
    belongs_to :match
end

app/models/player_match.rb

class PlayerMatch < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :player
    belongs_to :match
end

Migrations

db/migrate/create_matches.rb

class CreateMatches < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :matches do |t|
      t.datetime :happened_at
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

db/migrate/create_players.rb

class CreatePlayers < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :players do |t|
      t.string :name
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

db/migrate/create_teams.rb

class CreateTeams < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :teams do |t|
      t.string :name
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

db/migrate/create_player_matches.rb

class CreatePlayerMatches < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :player_matches do |t|
      t.integer :match_id
      t.integer :player_id
      t.integer :player_shots_on_goal
      t.integer :player_goals_scored
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

db/migrate/create_team_matches.rb

class CreateTeamMatches < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :team_matches do |t|
      t.integer :match_id
      t.integer :team_id
      t.integer :team_points
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

Edit1: @Mischa should share credit here! :)

Edit2: Sorry about the many versions, I totally underestimated this problem.

share|improve this answer
1  
And how will you store shots on goal, goals scored?? –  Mischa Aug 3 '12 at 10:01
1  
But with has_many :players, through: :teams you cannot store that on an individual player's level, because the association with a player goes through teams. –  Mischa Aug 3 '12 at 10:05
1  
I am saying your has_many through does not make much sense. Even less now that you posted a migration that contains player_id in the match table. See: guides.rubyonrails.org/… If you still think that this is correct, please give an example how you will use this code. –  Mischa Aug 3 '12 at 10:17
1  
The fact that you have player_id in the match table suggests belongs_to player, which is obviously incorrect. I think you need another model. E.g. PlayerMatchScore that belongs_to :match and belongs_to :player. And then in Match: has_many :player_match_scores. Something like that. –  Mischa Aug 3 '12 at 10:26
1  
No problem. It's rather complication to model a situation like this. I am still thinking about how I would do it. –  Mischa Aug 3 '12 at 10:36

Player Has and belongs to Many Match

That table should contain the details of the player playing that match. For example for which team he played, from which minute (since players can change) etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Assuming a sport like Cricket for example in which players are fixed throughout and cannot change. –  Kopty Aug 3 '12 at 15:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.