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I am using .NET mapping library AutoMapper in my application, and I have a generic extension method like this:

public static T2 Map<T1, T2>(this T1 o)
{
    return Mapper.Map<T1, T2>(o);
}

...

var nc = new NonCustomer();
Customer c = nc.Map<NonCustomer, Customer>();

Is there any way I can get rid of the T1 generic parameter from the extension method so it is inferred? Resulting in a call like this:

var nc = new NonCustomer();
Customer c = nc.Map<Customer>();
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You do not need to use generic version for T1 parameter.

You just need to change it to object:

public static TDest Map<TDest>(this object o)
{
    // todo check o is not null
    return (TDest) Mapper.Map(o, o.GetType(), typeof (TDest));
}

If you are using AutoMapper v2 and above, you could write it as following:

public static TDest Map<TDest>(this object o)
{
    return Mapper.Map<TDest>(o);
}
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1  
Then the method isn't so generic, is it? You have to box value types to use it this way. –  Michael Graczyk Aug 3 '12 at 9:56
    
@MichaelGraczyk AutoMapper will box it anyway github.com/jbogard/AutoMapper/blob/master/src/AutoMapper/… –  hazzik Aug 3 '12 at 9:59
    
@MichaelGraczyk: This solution brings the box issue, but to be honest, it does eliminate one generic parameter...it's a nice solution if T1 is always a class. –  Danny Chen Aug 3 '12 at 10:00
    
@hazzik You are quite right. –  Michael Graczyk Aug 3 '12 at 10:02
    
@hazzik Somebody should fix that. It doesn't seem like there's any reason for the box. –  Michael Graczyk Aug 3 '12 at 10:04

No, there is no way. Generic type inference doesn't work on return types. This kind of puts the usefulness of your extension method questionable. Why not directly working with the .Map<TSource, TDest> method?

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Yeah if the return type cannot be inferred - then it does put the usefulness of the method in question! Thought I may have been missing something –  jcvandan Aug 3 '12 at 9:53
    
No, you are not missing anything. Generic type inference could operate only on method input parameters. –  Darin Dimitrov Aug 3 '12 at 9:54

No, you can't, because there's no such thing as partial type inference in c#.

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Only when you remove the T1 generic type altogether and write a specific method for NonCustomer:

public static T2 Map<T2>(this NonCustomer o)
{
    return Mapper.Map<NonCustomer, T2>(o);
}
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Obviously this answer is correct! but why do I have a impulse to downvote? –  Danny Chen Aug 3 '12 at 10:01
1  
@DannyChen: No idea. Why do you? –  Steven Aug 3 '12 at 10:04
1  
The reason why OP use generic T1 here is because he wants more types can be mapped. An extension method to NonCustomer only removes other mapping type possibility. –  Danny Chen Aug 3 '12 at 10:07

Great question. I've always been too lazy to answer it for myself but then the cobbler's children always get extension methods last...

You could make it a bit DRYer and arguably a touch prettier by side stepping the issue and doing one inference at a time:

public static MapperSource<T> Mapper(this T that)
{
    return new MapperSource<T>( that);
}

public class MapperSource<T>
{
    public T2 To<T2>
    {
        return Mapper.Map<T,T2>();
    }
}

Which allows you to:

var nc = new NonCustomer();
Customer c = nc.Mapper().To<Customer>();

A more common way (for me anyway) to consume those is to set up helpers for each Mapper.CreateMap'd route as follows:

public static Customer ToResult(this NonCustomer that)
{
    return that.Mapper().To<Customer>();
}

(Sadly because there are no Extension Properties, it can't get any prettier than this. Then again, it'll all be moot when we're all using F#)

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