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I would need to have two different projects, let's say internal and external, which use the same data layer, and I would like to avoid replicating the configuration file for dryness reasons.

I have looked to the sub projects documentation at http://www.playframework.org/documentation/2.0.2/SBTSubProjects but the doc is pretty short.

I am now aware of the possibility to modularize the configuration, thanks to @Georg Engel

import sbt._
import Keys._
import PlayProject._

object ApplicationBuild extends Build {

    val appName         = "MyApp"
    val appVersion      = "1.0-SNAPSHOT"

    val appDependencies = Seq(
      // Add your project dependencies here,
    )

    lazy val common = Project(appName + "-common", file("modules/common"))

    lazy val website = PlayProject(
    appName + "-website", appVersion, path = file("modules/website")
    ).dependsOn(common)

    lazy val adminArea = PlayProject(
    appName + "-admin", appVersion, path = file("modules/admin")
    ).dependsOn(common)

    lazy val main = PlayProject(appName, appVersion, appDependencies, mainLang = SCALA).settings(
      // Add your own project settings here      
    ).dependsOn(
    website, adminArea
    )


}

and the compilation errors I had where only due to the reverse router (canceling routes but not controller actions result in this)

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1  
I recommend using aggregate... The common project doesn't seem to be compiled at all. You have to provide a routes file in your subprojects, defining the routes you are using... –  Georg Engel Aug 6 '12 at 15:56
1  
Have you considered manually awarding the bounty or accepting my answer? Glad you got it up and running... Do You think we should edit our posts to better fit in Q/A style of stackoverflow? –  Georg Engel Aug 13 '12 at 13:31
    
An aggregate and a git submodule just doesn't solve the stuff (especially the git submodule). –  jwinandy Aug 16 '12 at 6:29
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

We are using submodules like this (where "core" is the shared submodule):

Build.scala

val coreModule = PlayProject(appName + "-core", "1.0", appDependencies, path = file("modules") / "core")

val main = PlayProject(appName + "-app", appVersion, appDependencies, mainLang = SCALA).settings(
  // Add your own project settings here      
).dependsOn(coreModule).aggregate(coreModule)

Unfortunatelly submodules have to live under the project tree ("../core" as path isn't possible) - so we are using git submodules to get the shared module into the tree:

git submodule add git://git.example.com/modules.git modules

git submodule init

git submodule update

Propably SVN externals, mercurial submodules etc. will do this job too.

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1  
I do not need a core play project, but rather a sbt independent module containing a conf which I can import in my main project. –  Edmondo1984 Aug 6 '12 at 9:22
    
Disclaimer: we are not using plays data layer... it should be possible to include a file holding the shared configs from within your application.conf unsing 'include "core.conf"'. This is read from classpath, so putting it into your core-conf-folder enables you to share configuration as well. –  Georg Engel Aug 6 '12 at 9:26
    
the subproject can be a "regular" (non-play) project as well: val foo = Project(id = "hello-foo", base = file("foo")). As long as core.conf is on the classpath you are able to include it in application.conf. As far as i know changes i a plain Project doesn't force play app to reload as changes are not detected automatically (but this changed for 2.0.1 to 2.0.2, so be patient if not correct any more) –  Georg Engel Aug 6 '12 at 9:53
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Here is what I do and have done. I make a multi-module Maven project where I basically keep all my core reusable code.

Then for all my other web projects (projects that make a WAR) I use SBT, Gradle, and even Ant with Maven plugins in some cases. Those projects hold there own config (like db host and creds).

framework
   - pom.xml
   - db-module
     - pom.xml
     - src/main/resources # possible classpath loading config here
     - etc...
   - mail-module
     - pom.xml
     - etc...
   - service-module
     - pom.xml
     - etc...

Other projects then just depend on the framework and for SBT projects (play 2.0) you can set it up so that one of your resolvers is a local maven repo: https://github.com/harrah/xsbt/wiki/Getting-Started-Library-Dependencies

EDIT for clarification: Framework pom.xml is the parent project. You can make the mail-module depend on the db-module and then in your separate web app project you can just depend on the mail-module and you will get both the mail-module and the db -module.

Many people throw Maven under the bus but it still does multi-module projects better than anything else.

More explanation:

share|improve this answer
    
If you want it to then yes. You can have inner module dependencies in a multi-module project. Maven will also prevent you from having circular dependencies. I recommend you look at the maven doc example I provided: sonatype.com/books/mvnex-book/reference/multimodule.html –  Adam Gent Aug 3 '12 at 14:24
    
This is not the solution I was looking for actually. I have multi-module projects based on Maven. My question is rather at conf level playframework.org/documentation/2.0/Configuration but there is no clear explanation about it –  Edmondo1984 Aug 6 '12 at 6:43
1  
Well I'm thinking of deleting my answer since you totally changed your question like 6 times and I misunderstood your original post so I'm getting -1s. Let me know if you want me to keep it. –  Adam Gent Aug 8 '12 at 14:02
1  
It is still relevant. Thank you for sharing your knowledge –  Edmondo1984 Aug 8 '12 at 17:00
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A source dependency on a module living somewhere in your source tree can help you to achieve the build you want :

import sbt._
import Keys._
import PlayProject._

object ApplicationBuild extends Build {

    val appName         = "test"
    val appVersion      = "1.0-SNAPSHOT"

    val appDependencies = Seq(
      // Add your project dependencies here,
    )

    lazy val main = PlayProject(appName, appVersion, appDependencies, mainLang = SCALA).settings(
      // Add your own project settings here      
    ).dependsOn(common)


    lazy val common = RootProject(file("../common")) 


}

You cannot mix a play project with another, so your configuration should be in "dependencies". The good thing with source dependencies is they are live in your project (thanks to the recursivity of SBT). If the source of your dependency change, your main project get the change at the next compile.

You can check the complete structure of my multimodule play app here: https://github.com/un-jon/play2MultiModule.

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1  
what is the difference between a RootProject and a Project? –  Edmondo1984 Aug 6 '12 at 21:59
    
It's just a way to declare "external" dependencies. It's more flexible than Project. (See github.com/harrah/xsbt/wiki/Full-Configuration (at "Project References" ) ). –  jwinandy Aug 8 '12 at 7:13
    
I am even more confused...why is more "flexible"? –  Edmondo1984 Aug 8 '12 at 7:22
2  
1. you don't have to define a module in a subdirectory. 2. External projects have their own life, for example their build don't have to use the playPlugin. –  jwinandy Aug 10 '12 at 13:37
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