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Eclipse source menu has a "generate hashCode / equals method" which generates functions like the one below.

String name; 
@Override
public int hashCode()
{
    final int prime = 31;
    int result = 1;
    result = prime * result + ((name == null) ? 0 : name.hashCode());
    return result;
}

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj)
{
    if (this == obj)
        return true;
    if (obj == null)
        return false;
    if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;
    CompanyRole other = (CompanyRole) obj;
    if (name == null)
    {
        if (other.name != null)
            return false;
    } else if (!name.equals(other.name))
        return false;
    return true;
}

If I select multiple fields when generating hashCode() and equals() Eclipse uses the same pattern shown above.

I am not an expert on hash functions and I would like to know how "good" the generated hash function is? What are situations where it will break down and cause too many collisions?

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I suppose it good enough. Joshua Bloch is his book (Effective Java) cites as an example the same implementation of hashCode() and equals(). –  Nestor Aug 3 '12 at 11:54
    
It's just funny to realize that none of the answers can explain why this code is good. It looks like engineers like the Joshua Bloch recipe, but, unfortunately he seems to be the only one that understood why this recipe is good. Update : even Joshua says "Even the use of a prime number is less clear, but it is traditional". So I guess, even him had to leave this question behind to fellow mathematicians. –  Snicolas Dec 16 '13 at 11:29
    
Bloch also writes "while this recipe yields reasonably good hash functions, it does not yield state-of-the-art hash functions, nor do the Java platform libraries provide such hash functions as of release 1.6. Writing such hash functions is a research topic, best left to mathematicians and theoretical cumputer scientists." So if you really want to know why, you'd better go back to uni ;) –  Adam Jun 26 at 8:53
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can see the implementation of hashCode function in java.util.ArrayList as

public int hashCode() {
    int hashCode = 1;
    Iterator<E> i = iterator();
    while (i.hasNext()) {
        E obj = i.next();
        hashCode = 31*hashCode + (obj==null ? 0 : obj.hashCode());
    }
    return hashCode;
}

It is one such example and your Eclipse generated code follows a similar way of implementing it. But if you feel that you have to implement your hashCode by your own, there are some good guidelines given by Joshua Bloch in his famous book Effective Java. I will post those important points from Item 9 of that book. Those are,

  1. Store some constant nonzero value, say, 17, in an int variable called result.
  2. For each significant field f in your object (each field taken into account by the equals method, that is), do the following:

    a. Compute an int hash code c for the field:

    i. If the field is a boolean, compute (f ? 1 : 0).

    ii. If the field is a byte, char, short, or int, compute (int) f.

    iii. If the field is a long, compute (int) (f ^ (f >>> 32)).

    iv. If the field is a float, compute Float.floatToIntBits(f).

    v. If the field is a double, compute Double.doubleToLongBits(f), and then hash the resulting long as in step 2.a.iii.

    vi. If the field is an object reference and this class’s equals method compares the field by recursively invoking equals, recursively invoke hashCode on the field. If a more complex comparison is required, compute a “canonical representation” for this field and invoke hashCode on the canonical representation. If the value of the field is null, return 0 (or some other constant, but 0 is traditional)

    vii. If the field is an array, treat it as if each element were a separate field. That is, compute a hash code for each significant element by applying these rules recursively, and combine these values per step 2.b. If every element in an array field is significant, you can use one of the Arrays.hashCode methods added in release 1.5.

    b. Combine the hash code c computed in step 2.a into result as follows:

       result = 31 * result + c;
    
  3. Return result.

  4. When you are finished writing the hashCode method, ask yourself whether equal instances have equal hash codes. Write unit tests to verify your intuition! If equal instances have unequal hash codes, figure out why and fix the problem.

Java language designers and Eclipse seem to follow similar guidelines I suppose. Happy coding. Cheers.

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Yes, it is perfect :) You will see this approach almost everywhere in the Java source code.

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Generally it is good, but:

  1. Guava does it somehow better, I prefer it.
  2. Some frameworks can cause problems when accessing fields directly instead of using setters/getters, like Hibernate for example. For some fields that Hibernate creates lazy, it creates a proxy not the real object. Only calling the getter will make Hibernate go for the real value in the database. I wish I could find the Thread here on SO where this has been discussed, :(
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could you elaborate on that hibernate part ? –  Sikorski Aug 3 '12 at 12:02
4  
see this stackoverflow.com/a/256447/1282907 –  srikanth yaradla Aug 3 '12 at 12:04
    
@srikanthyaradla Perfect! thx –  Eugene Aug 3 '12 at 12:06
    
@Eugene: > Guava does it somehow better, I prefer it. I am curious - what is somehow better? –  jayeff Aug 3 '12 at 12:48
    
@jayeff Not much, you can find my reasons here : code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/wiki/… –  Eugene Aug 3 '12 at 13:05
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It's a standard way of writing hash functions. However, you can improve/simplify it if you have some knowledge about the fields. E.g. you can ommit the null check, if your class guarantees that the field never be null (applies to equals() as well). Or you can of delegate the field's hash code if only one field is used.

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I would also like to add a reference to Item 9, in Effective Java 2nd Edition by Joshua Bloch.

Here is a recipe from Item 9 : ALWAYS OVERRIDE HASHCODE WHEN YOU OVERRIDE EQUALS

  1. Store some constant nonzero value, say, 17, in an int variable called result.
  2. For each significant field f in your object (each field taken into account by the equals method, that is), do the following:
    a. Compute an int hash code c for the field:            
        i.   If the field is a boolean, compute (f ? 1 : 0).
        ii.  If the field is a byte, char, short, or int, compute (int) f.
        iii. If the field is a long,compute(int)(f^(f>>>32)).
        iv.  If the field is a float, compute Float.floatToIntBits(f).
        v.   If the field is a double, compute Double.doubleToLongBits(f), and then hash the resulting long as in step 2.a.iii.
        vi.  If the field is an object reference and this class’s equals method compares the field by recursively invoking equals, recursively invoke hashCode on the field. If a more complex comparison is required, compute a “canonical representation” for this field and invoke hashCode on the canonical representation. If the value of the field is null, return 0 (or some other constant, but 0 is traditional).
        vii. If the field is an array, treat it as if each element were a separate field. That is, compute a hash code for each significant element by applying these rules recursively, and combine these values per step 2.b. If every element in an array field is significant, you can use one of the Arrays.hashCode methods added in release 1.5. 
   b. Combine the hash code c computed in step 2.a into result as follows: result = 31 * result + c;
3. Return result.
4. When you are finished writing the hashCode method, ask yourself whether equal instances have equal hash codes. Write unit tests to verify your intuition! If equal instances have unequal hash codes, figure out why and fix the problem.
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