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I have the following interface:

[ContractClass(typeof(MyObjectContract))]
public interface IMyObject
{
    int CountOfItems { get; }
}

The following contract:

[ContractClassFor(typeof(IMyObject))]
public abstract class MyObjectContract
{
    int IMyObject.CountOfItems
    {
        get
        {
            Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<int>() > 0);
            return 1;
        }
    }
}

The following implementation:

public class MyObject : IMyObject
{
    private IEnumerable someEnumerable .... 

    public int CountOfItems
    {
        get
        {
            return this.someEnumerable.Count();
        }
    }
}

Now I'm getting a warning saying ensures unproven: Contract.Result<int>() > 0

How am I supposed to prove that count is greater than zero? I don't want to throw an exception in a getter, what am I missing?

thanks

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It cannot prove that the enumerable is going to return > 0. But I'm not sure how you'd enforce it. Also, I'd change someEnumerable into a list or an array otherwise it'll be iterated fully each time someone calls CountOfItems. –  Adam Houldsworth Aug 3 '12 at 11:57
    
Your code implies an object invariant that someEnumerable.Count() will always be greater than zero. Your first step to satisfying the property contract should be to make that object invariant explicit in your code. The details of how to satisfy that invariant depend on the details of how your code already assures that the invariant is satisfied. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Aug 3 '12 at 16:09
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4 Answers 4

As others have mentioned, you cannot statically prove that IEnumerable<T>.Count() returns a value greater than 0 due to limitations of the Base Class Library (.NET Framework) and the static checker. However, you can indicate to the static checker that you assume that fact to be true. This is the way you solve all such contract problems with the Base Class Libraries, or statements that the static checker cannot prove.

public int CountOfItems
{
    get
    {
        int count = this.someEnumerable.Count();
        Contract.Assume(count > 0);
        return count;
    }
}
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I think, you can't prove this in static.
Enumerable.Count<TSource> extension method doesn't define any contract about its return value (e.g., what this method should return for the endless sequence?).

So, CC stais checker warns you about this.

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But surely it want me to prove CountOfItems, not Enumerable.Count? The contract is for the behaviour of my object, not the internal implementation.. unless I've misunderstood something here.. –  MalcomTucker Aug 3 '12 at 12:12
    
The more I think about this answer, the more I think it's wrong. How, in the most general case, do you prove an ensures in a property getter? Apologies if I have misunderstood what you mean.. –  MalcomTucker Aug 3 '12 at 12:44
1  
@MalcomTucker: Static checker tries to prove contract by analyzing code. Your contract declares that IMyObject.CountOfItems will always be greater, than zero. OK, says static checker, let's look into code. Aha, there's call to Enumerable.Count. Does Enumerable.Count guarantee, that it always return a value, greater that zero? No, it doesn't. Сonsequence: there's no way to prove statically this contract. The only thing you can do here, is an assumption (see Contract.Assume), that someEnumerable.Count > 0. –  Dennis Aug 6 '12 at 5:45
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Let's assume that your code is correct. It works, and you are merely trying to get the code contracts system to recognize that fact.

This means specifically that calling CountOfItems on an instance of MyObject will always return a value greater than zero. It will not throw an exception, and it will not return a value of zero or less.

This means that someEnumerable will be assigned to some object, and someEnumerable.Count() will always return a value greater than zero for whatever object is referenced. These facts will be true at all times (since there is no restriction on when CountOfItems may be called.

This implies that there is an object invariant (whether it's spelled-out explicitly in the code or not) for MyObject which includes those facts. And since your code is correct (by assumption), the implementation of MyObject guarantees that someEnumerable is assigned and its count is greater than zero at all times.

Thus, in order to satisfy the contract on CountOfItems, the contracts system needs to be made aware of these invariants and how they are ensured.

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Ok thanks, I think I follow where you're going with this. On a related note - is it even necessary or desirable to prove everything Code Contracts warns you about? If I can't prove this invariant, but because of the structure of the code and the way it is consumed the ensures is actually true, is that sufficient? –  MalcomTucker Aug 4 '12 at 8:28
    
It would certainly be awesome if we could formally prove our code is correct. I don't actually have access to the static checker, so I don't know what it can do, but from what I have heard from others, we are not yet at the place where everything can be proven in this manner. As long as you can prove to yourself that it is correct, then an assertion of the fact may be all you need for the contracts. If, however, the invariant depends on code outside of this module ("the way it is consumed"), then I would not make the assertion. Rather, I would go ahead and throw an exception or something. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Aug 4 '12 at 23:36
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It appears adding a ContractInvariant method to the implementation resolves the warning.

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