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I need to put a string (from a file) in a matrix and print out the result. I have some issue in understanding the right way to do this so:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    const int MAX = 50;
    char mat[MAX][MAX];
    char str[MAX];
    char word[MAX];
    int row = 0;
    int i = 0;

    FILE * fp;

    fp = fopen ("file.txt", "r");

    if (fp == NULL)
        printf ("Error!\n");

    while (fgets(str, MAX, fp) != NULL)
    {
        sscanf (str, "%s\n", word);

        strcpy(mat[i][0], word);

        row++;
    }

    for (i = 0; i <= row; i++)
    {
            puts(mat[i][0]);
    }

    return 0;
}

I'm obliviously doing something wrong but... what?

I have a file like this:

One
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Hello
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1  
You didn't change i during the while(fgets ...) loop, so i = 0 the whole time. –  Qsario Aug 3 '12 at 12:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you compile this with gcc, it will give you two warnings: each warning points to one of the three major errors in the code:

main.c: In function 'main':
main.c:24: warning: passing argument 1 of 'strcpy' makes pointer from integer without a cast
main.c:31: warning: passing argument 1 of 'puts' makes pointer from integer without a cast

Each of those line numbers -- 24 and 31 -- is a line where you're using mat[i][0], which is a character, when you should instead use mat[i], which is a character array. Fix those, and then there's just one problem: you use i, which is always 0, in the while loop. Use row, which is incremented as the row progresses, and the program should work exactly as designed.

There are a couple of other things I would change to improve the program: your while loop reads a string into one buffer, copies it into a second buffer, then copies it into the matrix; you could just scan it directly into the matrix and be done with it!

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Thank you. My only last doubt is about the matrix structure. How could mat[i] be a character array if there is only one dimension (i) ? –  l_core Aug 3 '12 at 12:31
    
At least notionally, you can think of your matrix as an array of arrays; i.e., mat[0][0] is a char, mat[0] is an array of char, and mat is an array of arrays of char. Does that make sense? –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Aug 3 '12 at 12:36

A matrix usually contains numbers. Yours contains chars. There are problems with your code but to get a good answer you should tell us the format of the file you are reading (maybe paste a small one in your question).

EDIT: This file contains an array of strings separated by newline. You can read it like this (if the strings don't have any whitespace in them):

    while (fscanf(fp, "%s\n", mat[row]) > 0)
    {
        row++;
    }

    for (i = 0; i <= row; i++)
    {
            printf( "%s\n", mat[i]);
    }
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This is not helpful at all. The file format is obvious (one word per line) and there are some obvious bugs in the code that need fixing.) And of course, saying a matrix can only contain numbers is just wrong. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Aug 3 '12 at 12:05
    
This assumes you have an array of strings, not a matrix. A matrix is two-dimensional. –  Alex Aug 3 '12 at 12:06

You should copy the string to the element of matrix with the given index. You should pass the pointer to the first element of matrix to strcpy(i.e. remove the [0]).

Do something like:

while (fgets(str, MAX, fp) != NULL)
{
    sscanf (str, "%s\n", word);
    strcpy(mat[i], word);
    row++;
}

EDIT: also when printing the strings use only mat[i] not mat[i][0].

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I have done some changes to your code. First lets pin point your mistakes.

  1. char mat[MAX][MAX]; will not serves your intention of creating string matrix.

  2. It is unnecessary to do read sscanf (str, "%s\n", word);. Already you read it from file. you can directly use it.

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <string.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    
    int main (int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        const int MAX = 50;
        char *mat[MAX][MAX];
        char str[MAX];
        int i = 0, j = 0;
        int now = 0;
    
        FILE * fp;
    
        fp = fopen ("file.txt", "r");
    
        if (fp == NULL)
            printf ("Error!\n");
    
        while (fgets(str, MAX, fp) != NULL)
        {
            //sscanf (str, "%s\n", word);
    
            mat[i][j] = malloc(sizeof(str));
    
            strcpy(mat[i][j], str);
    
            j++;
            now++; //Tracks no.of elements 
            if(j == MAX)
            {
                 j = 0;
                 i++; //store in next row  
            }
        }
     for (i = 0; i < MAX; i++)
            for (j = 0; j < MAX; j++)
        {
                if(now == 0)
                    break;
    
                now--;
    
                puts(mat[i][j]);
                free(mat[i][j]);//Avoids memory leak        
        }
    
    return 0;
    

    }

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