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I'm working in a code that has a data structure like this:

type
  TData1 = record
    IntField: Integer;
    StrField: string;
  end;

  TData2 = record
    DateField: TDateTime;
    StrField: string;
  end;

var
  AData1 = array of ^TData1;
  AData2 = array of ^TData2;

Sometimes I have to add an element to one of that arrays, like this:

L := Length(AData1);
SetLength(AData1, L + 1);
New(AData1[L]);

How can I write a procedure that does that job of increasing the array size and allocating memory for a new item that works for any kind of pointer? And it must be done without changing the definitions of the records (TData1, TData2) and the arrays (AData1, AData2), so it won't break existing code.

Ps: I don't have much background with pointers and that kind of programming, I'd certainly use objects and dynamic linked lists, but in this case it's a legacy code and I can't change it, at least for now.

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Would it not just be much easier to let Delphi manage the record memory? Use array of TData1 instead. And in fact using dynamic arrays is rather low level and you are paying the cost of that. Surely you should use TList<TData1> here. Then you can use the Add method to, you know, add a new item. –  David Heffernan Aug 3 '12 at 12:13
    
@DavidHeffernan, yes, I'm aware of that and I agree with you. But that's the problem I described and the end of the question. Unfortunately that's the way it's done at the moment, it's a legacy code and it's running in production, these data structures are used everywhere, I can't change it at the moment. –  Rafael Piccolo Aug 3 '12 at 12:41
    
Besides that, the production code doesn't add one item at a time, it calls SetLength just once. This procedure that adds item per item I will use in my unit tests only. Sometimes I have to insert some data in those arrays in order to test some functions, the code is dependent of that specific arrays. I can't just rewrite everything from scratch, but I can start to change some things, starting by writing tests. One change at a time. –  Rafael Piccolo Aug 3 '12 at 13:04
    
SetLength and New are compiler intrinsics. They are implemented with a bit of compiler magic. They need to be passed type info. I'm sure you could lash up something generic but it would likely require taking a dependency on the implementation of the RTL. Do you have any particular Delphi version in mind? –  David Heffernan Aug 3 '12 at 13:17
2  
Have you looked at Arnaud Bouchez's TDynArray? I've not used it myself but I believe it could help you. –  David Heffernan Aug 3 '12 at 13:26
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Update:

This is not a full answer. Using TDynArray as mentioned by David may solve your problem.

Using RTTI I made a another solution for you. It is a generic solution and you can easily add more functions/capabilities. It will preserve your type declarations. Example of adding/removing records is included.

The record TDynPtArray handles any dynamic array of pointers to records. It is initialized with an Init call:

DPA.Init(TypeInfo(TData1), AData1);
Data1 := DPA.Add;  // Adds a record with default values and
                   // returns a pointer to the record
DPA.Remove; // Finalizes/deallocates the last record and 
            // shrinks the dynamic array

-

uses
  Windows,System.SysUtils,System.TypInfo;

Type
  TPtArray = array of Pointer;
  PPtArray = ^TPtArray;
  TDynPtArray = record
  private
    FDynArray: PPtArray;
    FTypeInfo: PTypeInfo;
    FTypeData: PTypeData;
  public
    constructor Init( T: Pointer; var dynArray);
    function Add : Pointer;
    procedure Remove;
    procedure Clear;
  end;

constructor TDynPtArray.Init(T: Pointer; var dynArray);
begin
  FTypeInfo := T;
  if  (FTypeInfo^.Kind <> tkRecord) then
    raise Exception.CreateFmt('%s is not a record',[FTypeInfo^.Name]);
  FTypeData := GetTypeData( FTypeInfo);
  FDynArray := @dynArray;
end;

function TDynPtArray.Add: Pointer;
var
  L: integer;
begin
  L := Length(FDynArray^);
  SetLength(FDynArray^,L+1);
  GetMem( FDynArray^[L], FTypeData^.elSize);
  ZeroMemory( FDynArray^[L], FTypeData^.elSize);
  Result := FDynArray^[L];
end;

procedure RecordClear(var Dest; TypeInfo: pointer);
asm
{$ifdef CPUX64}
  .NOFRAME
{$endif}
  jmp System.@FinalizeRecord
end;

procedure TDynPtArray.Remove;
var
 L: integer;
begin
  L := Length(FDynArray^);
  if (L = 0) then
    exit;
  RecordClear( FDynArray^[L-1]^,FTypeInfo); // Finalize record
  FreeMem( FDynArray^[L-1], FTypeData^.elSize);
  SetLength(FDynArray^,L-1);
end;

procedure TDynPtArray.Clear;
begin
  while (Length(FDynArray^) <> 0) do
    Self.Remove;
end;

And a little test:

type
  PData1 = ^TData1;
  TData1 = record
    IntField: Integer;
    StrField: string;
  end;
  TData1Arr = array of PData1;

var
  AData1: TData1Arr;
  Data1: PData1;
  DPA: TDynPtArray;
begin
  DPA.Init(TypeInfo(TData1), AData1);
  Data1:= DPA.Add;
  Data1^.StrField := '111';
  WriteLn(Data1^.IntField);
  WriteLn(Data1^.StrField);

  DPA.Clear;

  ReadLn;
end.
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