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Can anybody answer to me, how come below code eats up whole core of a C2D 2.6GHz CPU? It just downloads files in 10MB chunks, there can be like 600 of them, but the NSOperationQueue has a limit of 6 concurrent tasks.

How come the same app on Windows (written in C# eats only 2%, not 80%!), it is just a simple HTTP request!

for (DownloadFile *downloadFile in [download filesInTheDownload])
            {
                for (DownloadChunk *downloadChunk in [downloadFile chunksInTheFile])
                {
                    NSString *downloadPath = [[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@/%@", [download downloadFolder], [download escapedTitle]] stringByExpandingTildeInPath];
                    NSString *chunkPath = [downloadPath stringByAppendingFormat:@"/%@.%i", [downloadFile fileName], [downloadChunk chunkId]];

                    NSError *attributesError = nil;

                    NSDictionary *fileAttributes = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] attributesOfItemAtPath:chunkPath error:&attributesError];

                    NSNumber *fileSizeNumber = [fileAttributes objectForKey:NSFileSize];
                    uint64_t fileSize = [fileSizeNumber longLongValue];
                    NSLog(@"Chunk file size: %lli", fileSize);
                    uint64_t expectedSize = ([downloadChunk endingByte] - [downloadChunk startingByte]) + 1;
                    NSLog(@"Chunk expected size: %lli", expectedSize);
                    uint64_t newStartingByte = [downloadChunk startingByte] + fileSize;
                    if (fileSize == expectedSize)
                    {
                        NSLog(@"Chunk complete: %@.%i", [downloadFile fileName], [downloadChunk chunkId]);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        NSURL *fileURL = [[NSURL alloc] initWithString:[downloadFile filePath]];

                        NSMutableURLRequest *request = [NSMutableURLRequest requestWithURL:fileURL];
                        NSLog(@"Normal range: %lli-%lli", [downloadChunk startingByte], [downloadChunk endingByte]);
                        NSString *range = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"bytes=%lli-%lli", newStartingByte, [downloadChunk endingByte]];
                        [request setValue:range forHTTPHeaderField:@"Range"];
                        AFHTTPRequestOperation *operation = [[AFHTTPRequestOperation alloc] initWithRequest:request];
                        operation.outputStream = [NSOutputStream outputStreamToFileAtPath:chunkPath append:YES];

                        [operation setCompletionBlockWithSuccess:^(AFHTTPRequestOperation *operation, id responseObject) {
                            NSLog(@"%@", [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Chunk complete: %@.%i", [downloadFile fileName], [downloadChunk chunkId]]);
                            if (download.downloadedBytes == download.size)
                                [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] postNotificationName:@"downloadFinished" object:download];
                        } failure:^(AFHTTPRequestOperation *operation, NSError *error) {
                            NSLog(@"Error: %@", error);
                        }];

                        [operation setDownloadProgressBlock:^(NSInteger bytesRead, long long totalBytesRead, long long totalBytesExpectedToRead) {
                            download.downloadedBytes += bytesRead;
                        }];

                        [queue addOperation:operation];
                    }
                }
            }

Here are some time profiler screenshots, seems everything is because RunLoops if I read it correctly.

enter image description here enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
Measure this in time profiler (instruments) first to see where is the performance bottleneck! –  phix23 Aug 3 '12 at 13:12
    
Added some Profiler screenshots. –  Thunder Aug 3 '12 at 13:42
    
Now look at the samples from the main thread. Unfold the sample tree until you see your own code. The AFNetworking thread (2nd screenshot) looks okay from what I can see. –  phix23 Aug 3 '12 at 15:03
    
Thanks, I've also added a comment below, which reduced the CPU usage from 80% to 20-30%. Of course it is still a bit too high. Thanks for helping. –  Thunder Aug 3 '12 at 15:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Seems like downgrading most of the properties to nonatomic seems to lower the usage from 80% to 20-30%. Now only downloadedBytes are atomic. What can I do also to make improvements?

share|improve this answer

In assuming the last progress block completes the download, you're sort of shoving a round peg down a square hole. I'm not sure if that's causing your high CPU usage or not, but I'd certainly fix that. AFNetworking has a function just for this, [AFHTTPRequestOperation setCompletionBlockWithSuccess:failure:], documented here. The correct block will be called based on the HTTP status code returned.

In other words, instead of this:

    AFHTTPRequestOperation *operation = [[AFHTTPRequestOperation alloc] initWithRequest:request];
    operation.outputStream = [NSOutputStream outputStreamToFileAtPath:chunkPath append:YES];
    [operation setDownloadProgressBlock:^(NSInteger bytesRead, long long totalBytesRead, long long totalBytesExpectedToRead) {
        download.downloadedBytes += bytesRead;
        if (download.downloadedBytes == download.size)
            [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] postNotificationName:@"downloadFinished" object:download];
    }];

    [queue addOperation:operation];
    chunkId++;

Use this:

    AFHTTPRequestOperation *operation = [[AFHTTPRequestOperation alloc] initWithRequest:request];
    operation.outputStream = [NSOutputStream outputStreamToFileAtPath:chunkPath append:YES];
    [output setCompletionBlockWithSuccess: ^(AFHTTPRequestOperation *operation, id responseObject) {
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] postNotificationName:@"downloadFinished" object:download];
                                        }
                                  failure: ^(AFHTTPRequestOperation *operation, NSError *error) {
    // you should probably do something here
                                        }];

After that, I doubt you'd even need downloadedBytes. That removes your last atomic property, which should improve things.

share|improve this answer
    
Not exactly, each AFHTTPRequestOperation is just a portion of a whole download. Updated the code above. –  Thunder Aug 14 '12 at 13:46

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