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I am dealing with following case. I have a base class that have the IDisposable pattern, it means that it have the public virtual Dispose() method and the protected virtual Dispose(bool) method. But I am not able to implement this patter in the derived class in such way that I will not receive any CA warnings. Please consider following example:

public class UtilizeClass : IDisposable
{
    private MyData data;

    public UtilizeClass()
    {
        data = new MyData();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        data.Dispose(); // Cannot use Dispose(bool) because it is protected.
    }
}

public class MyData : Base, IDisposable
{
    // Here we have some managed resources that must be disposed.

    // How to implement the pattern?
}

public class Base : IDisposable
{
    public virtual void Dispose() { }
    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing) { }
}

All the time I receive contradictory CA warnings in the MyData class. For example: delete the Dispose() and move it logics to Dispose(bool).

Thank you very much for answer and help.

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can you show more of MyData? –  Daniel A. White Aug 3 '12 at 12:40
    
Is Base your own class, or one from a third party? –  Jon Hanna Aug 3 '12 at 12:41
    
Do you really need to use the Dispose(bool) method, typically this is only really needed if you actually have unmanaged resources that need to be released. –  CodingGorilla Aug 3 '12 at 12:44
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your base class shouldn't have void Dispose() be virtual, it should be implemented and invoke the virtual void Dispose(bool disposing) as part of its implementation.

For more detail, and an alternate API that's slightly clearer, check out:

http://haacked.com/archive/2005/11/18/acloserlookatdisposepattern.aspx

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If Base is your own class, then don't implement this anti-pattern.

The two-fold dispose (one if disposing is true, one if its false) is used when a class contains both managed resources that must be disposed (e.g. a Stream object that should have it's own Dispose called) and unmanaged resources that must be cleaned-up.

This is a bad idea. Instead have all your classes fit into one or two categories:

A. Classes with only unmanaged resources. Ideally only one per class:

public sealed class HandlesUnmanaged : IDisposable
{
  private IntPtr _someUnmanagedHandleOfSomeKind;
  public string DoSomething(string someParam)
  {
    // your useful code goes here;
    // make it thin, non-virtual and likely to be inlined
    // if you need to extend functionality, but it in a
    // containing Disposable class, not a derived class.
  }
  private void CleanUp()
  {
    //your code that cleans-up someUnmanagedHandleOfSomeKind goes here
  }
  public void Dispose()
  {
    CleanUp();
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);//finaliser not needed now.
  }
  ~HandlesUnmanaged()//not called if already disposed
  {
    CleanUp();
  }
}

Ideally you won't even need any classes like this, but use SafeHandle which does that for you.

B. Classes with one or more managed resources that need to be disposed:

public class NoUnmanaged : IDisposable
{
  private HandlesUnmanaged _likeAbove;
  private Stream _anExampleDisposableClass;
  public virtual void Dispose()
  {
    _likeAbove.Dispose();
    _anExampleDisposableClass.Dispose();
  } 
  /* Note no finaliser, if Dispose isn't called, then _likeAbove's
  finaliser will be called anyway. All a finaliser here would do is
  slow things up and possibly introduce bugs.
  */
}
public class DerivedNoUnManaged : NoUnmanaged
{
  Stream _weMayOrMayNotHaveAnotherDisposableMember;
  public override void Dispose()
  {
    //note we only need this because we have
    //another disposable member. If not, we'd just inherit
    //all we need.
    base.Dispose();
    weMayOrMayNotHaveAnotherDisposableMember.Dispose();
  }
}

In all, we've either got simple unmanaged-owning classes that do the same thing in their Dispose() and their finaliser, except the former calls GC.SuppressFinalize, or we've got simple non-unmanaged-owning classes that just Dispose() everything they need to dispose, including a call to base.Dispose() if necessary, and don't have finalisers. No needs to split off the logic into two types within the same class. No risk of finalisers calling something that's been finalised, or forcing more than necessary into the finalisation queue.

And ideally, you never even do the first type at all. Just the second type.

If you're forced into it by inheriting from another party's class, then just do:

public MyClass : Base
{
  Stream _forExample;
  public override void Dispose(bool disposing)
  {
    if(disposing)
    {
      _forExample.Dispose();
    }
    base.Dispose(disposing);
  }
}

Don't handle the disposing == false case yourself, because don't have unmanaged resources mixed in there.

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There should almost certainly only be one virtual dispose method. If one does not wish to have a public method named Dispose(), then the virtual method should almost certainly be protected void Dispose(bool), with the Boolean effectively being a dummy parameter to change the signature. Otherwise, there are arguments in favor of having parameterless Dispose() be the virtual cleanup method, or in having it simply chain to virtual Dispose(bool). Since the only classes which should directly hold unmanaged resources (rather than managed resources which encapsulate them) are... –  supercat Aug 3 '12 at 17:04
    
...those which are designed from the ground up to serve that purpose, one shouldn't expect Dispose(false) to do anything except maybe log that it was called. BTW, the non-virtual Dispose should probably call GC.SuppressFinalize(). Derived classes should not add cleanup finalizers, but might legitimately add "alarm" finalizers. Putting the SuppressFinalize at the end of the non-virtual method will ensure it doesn't get called until after all derived-class disposal is complete. –  supercat Aug 3 '12 at 17:05
    
Why would one not want a public method called Dispose()? The only effect I can see is it makes it more likely that a user of the class might not realise it was disposable, and hence not dispose it. –  Jon Hanna Aug 3 '12 at 22:38
    
If I were designing the Framework, I would probably never have even suggested that any class should implement IDisposable without a public Dispose method; I certainly do not like the notion of having a method called Close which is synonymous with IDisposable.Dispose but not having a public Dispose method, but Microsoft does that sort of thing in parts of the framework. A more defensible situation for implementing IDisposable.Dispose without a public Dispose method would be in the case where a class implements an interface which inherits IDisposable but does not... –  supercat Aug 3 '12 at 22:46
    
...require any disposal action itself (some implementations of IEnumerable<T> are like that). If sealed class WizzleCollection<T>.Enumerator doesn't do anything in IDisposable.Dispose, one may not feel a need to particularly encourage callers who know that an object is a WizzleCollection<T>.Enumerator to call Dispose on it, even though someone who received such an object by calling IEnumerable<T>.GetEnumerator() would be expected to call Dispose (since they wouldn't know whether the thing they'd receive would actually require disposal or not). –  supercat Aug 3 '12 at 22:53
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The base class should have a public void Dispose() (non-virtual) that calls Dispose(true).

The derived class should simply override protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing).

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