Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
What do parentheses surrounding a JavaScript object/function/class declaration mean?
What does this “(function(){});”, a function inside brackets, mean in javascript?
A Javascript function

I encountered markup similar to this:

var something = (function(){
    //do stuff
    return stuff;
})()
document.ondblclick = function(e) { alert(something(e)) };

I don't understand the opening ( and closing )() in the something variable. Could you explain the difference to writing it like this?

var something = function(){
    //do stuff
    return stuff;
};

Thanks!

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Bergi, Felix Kling, squint, Esailija, Mahmoud Gamal Aug 3 '12 at 13:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
() invokes the function, the other parens are redundant. So in the second case something would be assigned to the function and in first case something would be assigned to stuff –  Esailija Aug 3 '12 at 12:40
    
go to google, type 'JavaScript closure' and start reading :) –  Elias Van Ootegem Aug 3 '12 at 12:41
1  
Both are function expressions. The first looks like an attempt to explicitly make it a function expression. For instance, remove var something =, and the first will still run. However, when the parentheses at the edges are removed, an error will be thrown: "function statement requires a name" (assuming that the writer has thought about this, of course!). The first is immediately invoked, so something references the value of the stuff variable. The latter something is a reference to a function. When called, it refers to the value of the stuff variable at that moment. –  Rob W Aug 3 '12 at 12:43
    
@EliasVanOotegem: That depends on the returned stuff, see Is the following JavaScript construct called a Closure? –  Bergi Aug 3 '12 at 12:45
    
@Esailija @RobW meaning that in the first case the function is executed every time I use the something variable (which could therefore change every time), but in the second case the function is executed only at the variable declaration, and something always returns the same value? –  Sean Aug 3 '12 at 12:47
show 8 more comments

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's probably easier to understand if you leave the redundant parens out because they serve no purpose:

var something = function() {
    return 3;
} // <-- a function. 
(); // now invoke it and the result is 3 (because the return value is 3) assigned to variable called something 

console.log(something) //3 because the function returned 3 

var something = function() {
    return 3;
}; // a function is assigned to a variable called something

console.log(something) //logs the function body because it was assigned to a function
console.log(something()) //invoke the function assigned to something, resulting in 3 being logged to the console because that's what the function returns
share|improve this answer
    
Accepted this answer because it was the simplest and clearest to me, but really all answers were correct and extremely useful! Thank you!! –  Sean Aug 3 '12 at 13:40
    
@Sean thanks a lot, I was about to delete it because it was not getting upvotes :P –  Esailija Aug 3 '12 at 13:49
    
I'd rather add those redundant parens. JSLint says: "Wrap an immediate function invocation in parentheses to assist the reader in understanding that the expression is the result of a function, and not the function itself." –  Vain Fellowman Aug 3 '12 at 13:59
2  
@VainFellowman yes I was afraid someone that agrees with crockford would come here and comment that. I disagree because I would just make a function declaration (function something(){}) if the result would just be the function itself anyway. The declaration is easier to write and you get a named function for free as well. But this is just an opinion as is what JSLint says. –  Esailija Aug 3 '12 at 14:01
    
@Esailija good point. Having a named function is a good thing anyway, for example in debugging. Adding those parens is a good habit I think, it costs no extra time and is way easier to understand. –  Vain Fellowman Aug 3 '12 at 14:04
show 3 more comments

On the question what it does, read all the comments and other answers. They are absolutely right.

Why would you want to use it? You find this pattern very often when using closures. The intent of the following code snippet is to add an event handler to 10 different DOM elements and each one should alert it’s ID attribute (e.g. “You’ve clicked 3″). You should know that if this was your actual intent, then there is a much easier way to do this, but for academic reasons let’s stick with this implementation.

var unorderedList = $( "ul" );
for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    $("<li />", {
        id: i,
        text: "Link " + i,
        click: function() {
            console.log("You've clicked " + i);
        }
    }).appendTo( unorderedList );
}

The output of the above code may not be what you first expect. The result of every click handler will be “You’ve clicked 9″ because the value of i at the point the event handler was fired is “9″. What the developer really wanted is for the value of i to be displayed at the point in time the event handler was defined.

In order to fix the above bug we can introduce a closure.

var unorderedList = $( "ul" ), i;

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    $("<li />", {
        id: i,
        text: "Link " + i,
        click: function(index) {
            return function() {
                console.log("You've clicked " + index);
            }
        }(i)
    }).appendTo( unorderedList );
}

You can execute and modify the above code from jsFiddle.

One way to fix the above code is to utilize a self-executing anonymous function. That is a fancy term that means we are going to create a nameless function and then immediately call it. The value of this technique is that the scope of the variable stays within the function. So, first we will surround the event handler content in a function and then immediately call the function and pass in the value of i. By doing that, when the event handler is triggered it will contain the value of i that existed when the event handler was defined.

Further reading on closures: Use Cases for JavaScript Closures

share|improve this answer
1  
Many words to say a simple thing. Do you really need to throw in unrelated jQuery syntax to confuse the OP? –  Rob W Aug 3 '12 at 12:46
    
Your answer in the comments is perfectly right of course (+1 btw). It's an example of a simple use case. And I guess jQuery is widely known, so it makes sense to use it in an example one could actually come accross. –  Vain Fellowman Aug 3 '12 at 12:50
    
You said "In order to fix the above bug we can introduce a closure.", but the function you assign to click in the first example is a already a closure (it closes over i). Using a closure is not the way to solve that problem, making a function call and creating a new scope is the solution. That's what you have done in the second example, but you have not introduced a new closure (at least you are not using it as such). –  Felix Kling Aug 3 '12 at 12:56
    
@Felix Kling yes, you are right. It is a closure too. By using a self executing anonymous function, we create a new scope, as you state in your comment. –  Vain Fellowman Aug 3 '12 at 13:00
add comment

(function(){ ... }) is a (anonymous) function expression, you could e.g. assign that value to a variable.

The brackets behind it will immidiately execute the function expression, resulting in the return value of the function (in here: stuff). The construct is called IIFE.

When stuff is a function (which I assume, because you invoke something lateron), this is called a closure - the returned function (stuff, assigned to something) still has access to the variables in the execution context of that anonymous function.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Check the JavaScript FAQ section, too: Here are some pretty good explanations and examples

Ok, why should you use this:

Suppose my script is running, and there are a couple of things (I'm, for instance, looping through a nodes list) I might be needing later on. That's why I might choose to do something like this:

for(var i=0;i<nodesList.lenght;i++)
{
    if (nodesList[i].id==="theOneINeed")
    {
        aClosure = (function(node,indexInNodesList)//assign here
        {
            return function()
            {
                node.style.display = 'none';//usable after the parent function returns
                alert(indexInNodesList+ ' is now invisible');
            }
        })(nodesList[i],i);//pass the element and its index as arguments here
        break;
    }
}
i = 99999;
aClosure();//no arguments, but it'll still work, and say i was 15, even though I've just 
//assigned another value to i, it'll alert '15 is now invisible'

What this enables me to do is to prevent function arguments from being garbage collected. Normally, after a function returns, all its var's and arguments are GC'd. But in this case, the function returned another function that has a link to those arguments (it needs them), so they're not GC'ed for as long as aClosure exists.

As I said in my comment. Google closures, practice a bit, and it'll dawn on you... they really are quite powerful

share|improve this answer
    
You are mixing the concept of closures and self-invoking functions, which can be very confusing. –  Felix Kling Aug 3 '12 at 13:07
    
you're right, but I merely wanted to point out to why you might want to use them. A closure was the first thing that sprung to mind. Especially because in the snippets the OP provided, the return value/object is a function. Looked like a closure to me –  Elias Van Ootegem Aug 3 '12 at 13:23
add comment

All of the answers were good, but I think the simplest answer has been skimmed over:

var something = (function(){
    //do stuff
    return stuff;
})()

After this code executes, something becomes stuff. The function that returned stuff is executed before something is assigned.

var something = function(){
    //do stuff
    return stuff;
};

After this code executes, something is a function which returns stuff. The function that returns stuff was never executed.

share|improve this answer
    
That's because this was already discussed in the comments :P –  Esailija Aug 3 '12 at 13:06
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.