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Here is my class Bar:

class Bar:
    def __init__(self, start, end, open, volume, high=open, low=open, last=open):
        self.start = start
        self.end = end
        self.open = open
        self.high = high
        self.low = low
        self.last = last
        self.volume = int(volume)

    def __str__(self):
        return self.start.strftime("%m/%d/%Y\t%H:%M:%S") + "\t" + self.end.strftime("%H:%M:%S") + "\t" +str(self.open) + "\t" + str(self.high) + "\t" + str(self.low) + "\t" + str(self.last) + "\t" + str(self.volume)

1) I am trying to initialize the high, low, and last for whatever open is. Is this the right way to do this?

2) When I do print(str(bar)) I get funny output such as...

03/13/2012 12:30:00 13:30:00 138.91 <built-in function open> 138.7 <built-in function open> 13177656

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you had written your function as

def __init__(self, start, end, foo, volume, high=foo, low=foo, last=foo):
    self.start = start
    self.end = end
    self.open = foo
    self.high = high
    self.low = low
    self.last = last
    self.volume = int(volume)

you would have gotten a NameError complaining that the name foo is not defined. This is because the default value for a parameter cannot refer to another parameter, which isn't yet defined when you try to take its value. (Default values are set when the method is defined, not when it is called.)

However, open is a built-in function in Python, so it was defined; it just wasn't the open you meant it to be. The right way to do this is probably

class Bar:
    def __init__(self, start, end, open, volume, high=None, low=None, last=None):
        self.start = start
        self.end = end
        self.open = open
        self.high = open if high is None else high
        self.low = open if low is None else low
        self.last = open if last is None else last
        self.volume = int(volume)

In addition, you might want to use 'open_' instead of 'open' as the parameter name, just to avoid confusion (and temporarily shadowing) the built-in function.

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I wouldn't use _open as that designates the variable as being in some way "protected". I think it is slightly more customary to do open_ when you want to avoid keywords (which I would extend to avoid shadowing builtins). Otherwise, good answer (+1) –  mgilson Aug 3 '12 at 13:31
    
That's the convention I was thinking of. I'll update. –  chepner Aug 3 '12 at 13:32
    
In this case, it probably doesn't matter too much since the variable is being immediately assigned to a instance attribute self.open. But, I suppose that even regular arguments can be called with the argname=value syntax, so it would make a (small) difference in that case. –  mgilson Aug 3 '12 at 13:35
    
The biggest problem with a parameter named open would be trying to actually call the open function in this method, although __builtin__.open is available. –  chepner Aug 3 '12 at 13:41
1  
Yes. You addressed the biggest problem nicely in your answer. I was just adding a (very) minor point to help make it slightly better. –  mgilson Aug 3 '12 at 13:49

You are aware, right, that open is the built-in Python function for opening a file? That is, you are assigning a method to a variable.

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well that explains #2! Thanks. How come it works for the low value? If I rename open to something else, is it the correct way to initialize the other variables? –  Joshua Aug 3 '12 at 13:02
    
@Joshua: No, it is not. See my answer for why it doesn't work. –  phant0m Aug 3 '12 at 13:06

This doesn't work.

The default argument is evaluated exactly once when the function is being parsed. This implies, that it must have a value: The other formal parameters in the method signature do not have a value. They are more like placeholders. As such, it's impossible to do what you want.

Python will search for a preexisting identifier called open, always assign that very object it represented at that time to your variables high and low when the function is executed.

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I don't think you can do that. You have that output because with "open" the built-in function open() is considered. If instead of calling open you use another name you will get an error.

If low, high and last cannot be None you can do:

class Bar:
def __init__(self, start, end, open, volume, high=None, low=None, last=None):
    self.start = start
    self.end = end
    self.open = open
    self.high = high if high is not None else open
    self.low = low if low is not None else open
    self.last = last if last is not None else open
    self.volume = int(volume)
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In:

def __init__(self, start, end, open, volume, high=open, low=open, last=open)

open is referring to the builtin open method. Passing methods as parameters is very useful in some situations, such as: max(sequence, key=itemgetter(2)) where a callable is expected.

I suspect you want to default high, low, last to be the value of open that's passed to __init__, in which case I'd use keyword arguments.

def __init__(self, start, end, open, volume, **kwargs):
    for k in ('high', 'low', 'last'):
        setattr(self, k, kwargs.get(k, open))

Alternatively:

def __init__(self, start, end, open, volume, high=None, low=None, last=None):
    if high is None:
        self.high = open
    # etc...

I would also not use open as a name...

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