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I'm very confused with how the Google App Engine (GAE) User/login API works. They mention you can authenticate Users via Google Accounts, Google Apps Accounts, or OpenID.

I don't want to force my users into requiring them to have GMail accounts, any other kind of Google account (Apps or otherwise), or an OpenID account. If my user has a valid email of john@example.com, then he/she should be able to register with my app, get an account with us, and login using that valid email.

So my question is: is this even possible, or does GAE require users to have GMail or OpenID accounts first?!?

If this is possible, then can I still use the User/login API service that GAE provides, or do I have to use my own homegrown login/authentication system? And, if I have to use my own system, are there any restrictions as to what I can/can't use/do?

Thanks in advance!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can optionally use Google Apps domains if you want - that will work perfectly.

But if you do not want to use any of the options that Google provides or for that matter, any other OAuth based security service, then you will need to roll your own authentication mechanism.

I do not think any restriction is put on that. You will need to define your entities in the Datastore and come up with your own authorization/permissions stuff.

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Thanks @Romin (+1) - with Google Apps domains, does that mean my app needs to use my-app.appspot.com as the domain? If not, whats the difference between a "Google Apps domain" and the appspot.com domain? Thanks again! –  IAmYourFaja Aug 3 '12 at 13:33
1  
Any Appengine application gets its own unique domain name in the form of : <AppId>.appspot.com - this is given to you by default and you can use it. However, if you want you can use your own custom domain too and map it to your appspot.com domain, so that folks can refer to your app at yourdomain.com and it will actually go to your appengine application. So in summary, you are not restricted to using my-app.appspot.com. In fact refer to the Google Apps Provisioning API and groups users to give them rights, etc. –  Romin Aug 3 '12 at 13:38
    
Thanks +1 again! Perhaps I am mis-understanding you: if I were to use Google Apps for User authentication, what constraints would this place on my app and my users (if any)? In other words, why do you think this is a perfect solution for what I am looking for? Thanks again! –  IAmYourFaja Aug 3 '12 at 18:39
    
I am not saying it is perfect or anything like that. I meant more than if the organization you are targeting already is a Google Apps domain, then you can a) Use it seamlessly b) If you want to use your Google Apps User groups/etc to decide on authorization, you can optionally use the API to do that also. c) If you dont want (b), just you Google Apps account for authentication and build your authorization logic. –  Romin Aug 3 '12 at 18:53

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