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I written a sql query as follows-

select 
    Customers.Id 
from 
    customers 
        inner join opportunities 
            on customers.id=opportunities.customerid 
group by 
    opportunities.customerId,
    Customers.Id 
order by 
    count(Opportunities.Id) desc

above query return the customes id with descending order of count of opportunity id.

I given above query as a sub query to another query as-

select * from Customers where Id in ( above query)

But my final query is not returning the same order result. it is changing my result order to ascending.

How to keep same ordering of records as like inner query/sub query?

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If you do not specify order by sql engine is free to sort (or not) any way it sees fit. Even if it seems that you are getting consistent order without order by, it is an illusion and can change in new version or revision of sql engine you are using. –  Nikola Markovinović Aug 3 '12 at 13:08

4 Answers 4

In SQL, tables are unordered. The results of a subquery are treated as a table; hence they are unordered. This is even true, perhaps counter-intuitively, when a subquery explicitly has an ORDER BY. The same, by the way, is true of views as well. A SQL database does not need to support ORDER BY in view definitions.

In other words, ORDER BY is for the presentation of the final data to the user.

I find that the best way to understand this is to realize that tables can be split across different partitions of storage (table spaces). Although users tend to think that a table is a "file", it can be (and often is) stored in multiple files. There is no inherent order between the records on multiple files.

In some special cases, ORDER BY can be used in a subquery. For instance, in databases that support TOP or LIMIT, you can use order by to specify the specific rows that you get. This is the only exception that comes to mind, but there may be others.

In any case, the solution is to put the order by on the outer query, as other answers have proposed.

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select 
    Customers.Id, count(Opportunities.Id) as cnt
from 
    customers 
        inner join opportunities 
            on customers.id=opportunities.customerid 
group by 
    opportunities.customerId,
    Customers.Id 

the order by cnt in the outer query

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Be carefull, Customers.ID can be duplicate in your query but not in OP requeriment. –  danihp Aug 3 '12 at 13:07
    
i have written the same query. But now i want select all columns of customer table. so i given it as a subquery. but it is not giving me actual result order –  Priyanka Aug 3 '12 at 13:11
select C.* from Customers C 
INNER JOIN  ( yourquery) T1 on T1.Id = C.id
order by Count desc

in your first query, you will need set

select 
    Customers.Id, Count(*) as [Count]
from (..)

and also remove the Order-By

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1  
Why you encolose count into brackets ? First you should ask for database brand ;) May be ` for MySql, " for oracle and so on. –  danihp Aug 3 '12 at 13:09

try like this

select * from Customers, (select Customers.Id, Row_Number() OVER(ORDER BY count(Opportunities.Id) desc) as row_num from customers inner join opportunities on customers.id=opportunities.customerid group by opportunities.customerId, Customers.Id ) as test where Customers.ID=test.Id order by test.row_num

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