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I want to launch an arbitrary number of threads, each executing the same method, but with different parameters. Each thread needs to block at a certain point, and wait until all threads have reached the same point. (Like racers getting into their starting blocks)

I'm stumped on how to make all threads signal to the starter that they are each ready to go.

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Without the "arbitrary number of threads" WaitHandle might be an option for you. But for really large numbers you should use a semaphore. –  Mithrandir Aug 3 '12 at 13:54
    
Even with a well known number of threads, how would WaitHandle help the starter? –  Ralph Shillington Aug 3 '12 at 13:56
    
The starter would have to use WaitAll so all the other threads could signal the reaching of certain point. –  Mithrandir Aug 3 '12 at 13:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The solution is to use Barrier Class.

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i think that using locking you can synchronize the thread's access.

try this:

lock (lockThis)
{
    // Access thread-sensitive resources.
}
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How would you know that all threads are completed? –  Peter Ritchie Aug 3 '12 at 15:04

I was struggling with multithreading too not so long ago. What you are trying to achieve can be done in a very simple way using just what you know. Here is an idea :

    class MyThread
    {
    private Thread thread;
    private bool isWaitingAtPointA = false;
    private bool continueWorking = false;

    public MyThread ()
    {
         thread = new Thread(DoMyStuff);
    }

    private void DoMyStuff() 
    { 
        //do stuff

        //when at point A :
        isWaitingAtPointA = true;
        while (!continueWorking)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(10);
        }
        isWaitingAtPointA = false;
        continueWorking = false;

        //do more stuff

    }

    public bool isAtWaitingPointA()
    {
        return isWaitingAtPointA;
    }
}

Then have a List of MyThread in your main thread that will instantiate all the MyThread objects, start their threads and also unlock them by setting from your main thread continueWorking to true. Obviously you can check if all the threads are at point A by calling isAtWaitingPointA(). This approach is called "control variables" I believe (please someone correct me if I am wrong) and here the controls variables are the bools isWaitingAtPointA and continueWorking. The method you want them all to use is here represented by DoMyStuff() which can be defined somewhere else to avoid code redundancies.

I hope this inspires you =)

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How does this detail whether x number of threads are still performing work or not? –  Peter Ritchie Aug 3 '12 at 15:05
    
@Peter Ritchie : Sure, adding another control variable is very hard... Come on ! Are we programers or all noobs here ? Plus if you count the number of instances waiting and do a simple substraction there you go you have your answer. This is not a programmatic problem. And the question you're asking was not asked. I think the barrier class is overly complicated for this task, or the problem has been described too simply. Why am I downgraded ? –  Lewis Aug 6 '12 at 8:41
    
I'll address only a couple problems with this code: 1) it doesn't scale. With the code you posted, if there were more threads and CPUs/cores, you'd have a huge "context switching" problem. This would end up putting a huge load on the CPU as each thread "spins" waiting for flag to change. e.g. the CPU would be a 100% load before it go to any "work" ("do stuff here" comment) 2) There's no way for any other code to change. Sure, you can assume the reader could "figure that stuff out" but you made no attempt to even post code that was usable (ignoring the design issues). –  Peter Ritchie Aug 6 '12 at 14:49
    
@Peter Ritchie : Thanks for posting the constructive comment I was waiting for. –  Lewis Aug 7 '12 at 14:03

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