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I'm calling a JavaScript function from an onclick event in a JSP page.

    <%
       String value = "06654"
    %>

  <body>
   <a href="javascript://" onclick="myFunction(<%= value %>)">Click Me!</a>
  </body>

My JavaScript function is like this

    function myFunction(myString)
   {
      alert(myString);
      //Do Stuff;
   }

myString is equal to 06654 but I'm getting 6654 when I alerts it's value. How do I stop js from automatically parsing the String to an int?

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4  
It does not do that automatically (unless you are using myString with operators that work on numbers). You must be processing the argument you pass to myFunction somehow. –  Felix Kling Aug 3 '12 at 13:55
1  
It doesn't do that automatically, I still get the '0' here: jsfiddle.net/53v3y –  Hunter McMillen Aug 3 '12 at 13:56
1  
What are you passing to myFunction? It must be an int. call toString on whatever you are passing to it. –  DarkCthulhu Aug 3 '12 at 13:57
1  
Can you post above how you actually call this function? That would make this a lot easier. –  Hunter McMillen Aug 3 '12 at 13:58
5  
Have a look at the generated source. If the value you pass to myFunction is not enclosed in quotes, it will be interpreted as number. You probably want myFunction('<%= value %>'). Strings are delimited by quotation marks in JavaScript (as in many other languages). Be aware that some part of the code (<%= ... %>) runs on the server and its output is then evaluated by the client. –  Felix Kling Aug 3 '12 at 14:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you output the string into the page, the result will be

… onclick="myFunction(06654)" …

which is obviosly interpreted as a number. To make it a JavaScript string, put quotes around it:

… onclick="myFunction('<%= value %>')" …
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