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I have a table in SQL Server 2012 that tracks login and logout times like so:

UserId    Type    InsertDate
2134      1       20120803 06:32:02.230
2134      1       20120803 10:12:24.350
2134      2       20120803 10:29:21.550
2134      2       20120803 14:10:34.220
5915      1       20120802 14:57:57.453
5915      2       20120802 16:59:00.477

(Type 1 is log in, type 2 is log out.)

I want to query this table - to show a grouped list of userids with the calculated timespan in seconds for each login/logout pair, so I end up with something like:

UserID    Duration 
2134      1017 
5915      7263

UPDATE: There can be multiple sets of log-in/log-out pairs for an individual user and there may be a login without a corresponding log out. I'd like to ignore log-ins or log-outs that don't have a corresponding value.

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2  
What if the user has two pairs of entries? What if the type 1 or type 2 entry is missing? –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 3 '12 at 14:47
3  
Are there any edge cases to consider? If all of these rows were for the same user (is that possible?) would there be the same result (with same user id) or a single row - if a single row, covering the max period? Can there be multiple 1s with only a single 2 or vice versa? Writing a query based on your simple example is straightforward, but I'm curious about how close it is to real data. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 3 '12 at 14:49
    
I suggest adding an additional login / logout for one of the users, and maybe add a user with a login only and a user with a logout only, and updating the desired output, so that the expectations for handling edge cases are clear. –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 3 '12 at 15:57
    
The new data overlaps - was this intended? Or should the second row have type = 2 and the third row have type = 3? Can you also update the expected output (it should have changed as well). –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 3 '12 at 16:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

SQL Server 2012 makes self-joins and aggregates a little unnecessary now. This solution handles multiple logins by the same user.

DECLARE @t TABLE(UserID INT, [Type] TINYINT, InsertDate DATETIME);

INSERT @t VALUES
 (2134,1,'20120803 10:12:24.350'),
 (2134,2,'20120803 10:29:21.550'),
 (2134,1,'20120803 11:22:24.350'),
 (2134,2,'20120803 11:47:21.550'),
 (5915,1,'20120802 14:57:57.453'),
 (5915,2,'20120802 16:59:00.477');

;WITH x AS (
  SELECT UserID, [Type], InsertDate, Prev = LAG(InsertDate, 1) OVER 
  (PARTITION BY UserID ORDER BY InsertDate) FROM @t
)
SELECT UserID, DATEDIFF(SECOND, Prev, InsertDate) FROM x WHERE [Type] = 2;

-- or if you want cumulative time per user even if there are multiple login events:

;WITH x AS (
  SELECT UserID, [Type], InsertDate, Prev = LAG(InsertDate, 1) OVER 
  (PARTITION BY UserID ORDER BY InsertDate) FROM @t
)
SELECT UserID, SUM(DATEDIFF(SECOND, Prev, InsertDate)) 
  FROM x WHERE [Type] = 2 GROUP BY UserID;

In previous versions you could use the more elaborate:

;WITH x AS 
(
  SELECT UserID, [Type], InsertDate, 
    rn = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY UserID ORDER BY InsertDate)
  FROM @t
)
SELECT x.UserID, DATEDIFF(SECOND, x.InsertDate, y.InsertDate) 
  FROM x INNER JOIN x AS y 
  ON x.UserID = y.UserID
  AND x.rn = y.rn - 1
  WHERE x.Type = 1
  AND y.Type = 2;
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3  
Learnt a new function( Lag ) today in sql server 2012 . Great answer ! –  praveen Aug 3 '12 at 15:07
    
Fantastic - this did the trick. Also learned about Lag (and Lead) - very comprehensive answer –  Chris B Aug 3 '12 at 15:47
    
@ChrisB glad to help. The MIN/MAX queries are far simpler of course, but they will only work if each user only has a single login/logout pair. I assume the sample data in the question is greatly simplified and is missing multiple types of edge cases. –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 3 '12 at 15:49
    
Yes - there may well be cases where there is a log in but not a corresponding log out and vice versa. Updating question to clarify there will be more than one set of entries. –  Chris B Aug 3 '12 at 15:52

try

select datediff(s, min(InsertDate), max(InsertDate)) as diff
from your_table
group by UserId 
share|improve this answer
    
This assumes each user only has one pair of entries in the table. –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 3 '12 at 14:52

If there is only one login and out;

select UserId, DATEDIFF(second,Min(InsertDate),Max(InsertDate)) as Duration, 
from Table1
Group By UserId
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1  
This answer is identical to @juergend's (except you added the UserId column to the output). –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 3 '12 at 14:54
    
Yes I didn't get the notification that an answer had been posted whilst I was writing mine. –  saj Aug 3 '12 at 14:57

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