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I was just about to implement an override of ToString() on a particular business class in order to produce an Excel-friendly format to write to an output file, which will be picked up later and processed. Here's what the data is supposed to look like:

5555555 "LASTN SR, FIRSTN"	5555555555	13956 STREET RD 	TOWNSVILLE	MI	48890	25.88	01-003-06-0934

It's no big deal for me to just make a format string and override ToString(), but that will change the behavior of ToString() for any objects I decide to serialize this way, making the implementation of ToString() all ragged across the library.

Now, I've been reading up on IFormatProvider, and a class implementing it sounds like a good idea, but I'm still a little confused about where all this logic should reside and how to build the formatter class.

What do you guys do when you need to make a CSV, tab-delimited or some other non-XML arbitrary string out of an object?

share|improve this question
up vote 37 down vote accepted

Here is a generic fashion for creating CSV from a list of objects, using reflection:

    public static string ToCsv<T>(string separator, IEnumerable<T> objectlist)
    {
        Type t = typeof(T);
        FieldInfo[] fields = t.GetFields();

        string header = String.Join(separator, fields.Select(f => f.Name).ToArray());

        StringBuilder csvdata = new StringBuilder();
        csvdata.AppendLine(header);

        foreach (var o in objectlist) 
            csvdata.AppendLine(ToCsvFields(separator, fields, o));

        return csvdata.ToString();
    }

    public static string ToCsvFields(string separator, FieldInfo[] fields, object o)
    {
        StringBuilder linie = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (var f in fields)
        {
            if (linie.Length > 0)
                linie.Append(separator);

            var x = f.GetValue(o);

            if (x != null)
                linie.Append(x.ToString());
        }

        return linie.ToString();
    }

Many variations can be made, such as writing out directly to a file in ToCsv(), or replacing the StringBuilder with an IEnumerable and yield statements.

share|improve this answer
    
While the objectList is huge, your solution will be slow and might have out-of-memory issue. – PerlDev Nov 29 '10 at 3:47
    
Instead of outputting to a string builder, you could let it output to some kind of an OutputStream instead, much like what XmlSerializer.Serialize(...) does. That would solve most out-of-memory issues. – Spoike Apr 30 '12 at 12:38
    
Or just change it to return an IEnumerable<string> and yield return the individual lines... then (unless you store the result in a list) you can enumerate it, e.g. to write out the result, with little memory overhead. Have added additional answer with these changes to your basic idea. – Gone Coding Jun 7 '12 at 10:28
    
I am not sure that this check if (x != null) is appropriate. If you have an object with fields { a, b, c } and different instances have either a, b, or c being null, you will not produce a valid CSV from which you can recover the instances. A better way would be to place nulls as NULL or a blank entry. – Ivaylo Slavov Oct 18 '15 at 15:38

Here is a simplified version of Per Hejndorf's CSV idea (without the memory overhead as it yields each line in turn). Due to popular demand it also supports both fields and simple properties by use of Concat.

Update 12 Feb 2016

After using my own code again in a project today, I realised I should not have taken anything for granted when I started from the example of @Per Hejndorf. It makes more sense to assume a default delimiter of "," (comma) and make the delimiter the second, optional, parameter. My own library version also provides a 3rd header parameter that controls whether a header row should be returned as sometimes you only want the data.

e.g.

public static IEnumerable<string> ToCsv<T>(IEnumerable<T> objectlist, string separator = ",", header = true)
{
    FieldInfo[] fields = typeof(T).GetFields();
    PropertyInfo[] properties = typeof(T).GetProperties();
    if (header)
    {
        yield return String.Join(separator, fields.Select(f => f.Name).Concat(properties.Select(p=>p.Name)).ToArray());
    }
    foreach (var o in objectlist)
    {
        yield return string.Join(separator, fields.Select(f=>(f.GetValue(o) ?? "").ToString())
            .Concat(properties.Select(p=>(p.GetValue(o,null) ?? "").ToString())).ToArray());
    }
}

so you then use it like this for comma delimited:

foreach (var line in ToCsv(objects))
{
    Console.WriteLine(line);
}

or like this for another delimiter (e.g. TAB):

foreach (var line in ToCsv(objects, "\t"))
{
    Console.WriteLine(line);
}

Practical examples

write list to a comma-delimited CSV file

using (TextWriter tw = File.CreateText("C:\testoutput.csv"))
{
    foreach (var line in ToCsv(objects))
    {
        tw.WriteLine(line);
    }
}

or write it tab-delimited

using (TextWriter tw = File.CreateText("C:\testoutput.txt"))
{
    foreach (var line in ToCsv(objects, "\t"))
    {
        tw.WriteLine(line);
    }
}

If you have complex fields/properties you will need to filter them out of the select clauses.


Previous versions and details below:

Here is a simplified version of Per Hejndorf's CSV idea (without the memory overhead as it yields each line in turn) and has only 4 lines of code :)

public static IEnumerable<string> ToCsv<T>(string separator, IEnumerable<T> objectlist)
{
    FieldInfo[] fields = typeof(T).GetFields();
    yield return String.Join(separator, fields.Select(f => f.Name).ToArray());
    foreach (var o in objectlist)
    {
        yield return string.Join(separator, fields.Select(f=>(f.GetValue(o) ?? "").ToString()).ToArray());
    }
}

You can iterate it like this:

foreach (var line in ToCsv(",", objects))
{
    Console.WriteLine(line);
}

where objects is a strongly typed list of objects.

This variation includes both public fields and simple public properties:

public static IEnumerable<string> ToCsv<T>(string separator, IEnumerable<T> objectlist)
{
    FieldInfo[] fields = typeof(T).GetFields();
    PropertyInfo[] properties = typeof(T).GetProperties();
    yield return String.Join(separator, fields.Select(f => f.Name).Concat(properties.Select(p=>p.Name)).ToArray());
    foreach (var o in objectlist)
    {
        yield return string.Join(separator, fields.Select(f=>(f.GetValue(o) ?? "").ToString())
            .Concat(properties.Select(p=>(p.GetValue(o,null) ?? "").ToString())).ToArray());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have a problem with this when two properties have the same value such as "FullName" and "DisplayName", I's struggling to pin point the bug, can anyone else see it? – Mark Jones Jun 21 '13 at 13:57
    
@Mark Jones: Please list your problem as a new question, with example etc. I cannot work out what you mean from your comment. Put a link to the question here if you want me to take a look. Thanks – Gone Coding Jun 23 '13 at 17:26
    
You also need to add appropriate escaping in for your separator of choice. Actual CSV, i.e. with a comma, should quote each field and escape backslashes, commas and double quotes with backslashes. – David Jan 30 '14 at 4:49
3  
Thanks for this elegant solution. For anyone else using this, you might like to replace Union with Concat so that fields do not get combined when they are the same – indeed005 Jul 21 '14 at 23:59
1  
@KoryGill: Updated Answer: Is that what you intended? – Gone Coding Jan 5 at 9:28

As rule of thumb I advocate only overriding toString as a tool for debugging, if it's for business logic it should be an explicit method on the class/interface.

For simple serialization like this I'd suggest having a separate class that knows about your CSV output library and your business objects that does the serialization rather than pushing the serialization into the business objects themselves.

This way you end up with a class per output format that produces a view of your model.

For more complex serialization where you're trying to write out an object graph for persistence I'd consider putting it in the business classes - but only if it makes for cleaner code.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree, I only override ToString() when I'm debugging. I would also create a separate serialization class but you can also add a property called "CSVString" that could build the string on the fly... – Joshua Jul 24 '09 at 21:37

I had an issue the HiTech Magic's variation were two properties with the same value, only one would get populated. This seems to have fixed it:

        public static IEnumerable<string> ToCsv<T>(string separator, IEnumerable<T> objectlist)
    {
        FieldInfo[] fields = typeof(T).GetFields();
        PropertyInfo[] properties = typeof(T).GetProperties();
        yield return String.Join(separator, fields.Select(f => f.Name).Union(properties.Select(p => p.Name)).ToArray());
        foreach (var o in objectlist)
        {
            yield return string.Join(separator, (properties.Select(p => (p.GetValue(o, null) ?? "").ToString())).ToArray());
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
2  
This will print out the headers for fields and properties and the values only for the properties, i.e. it will only work if there are no fields. – David Jan 30 '14 at 4:46
    
This answer has removed functionality from the original and will not work if there are also fields present. The solution is to use Concat instead of Union (have updated my answer with this). – Gone Coding Jan 5 at 9:31

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