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I am not sure if this is possible, but I'm trying to find a front-end solution to this situation:

I am setting a JavaScript variable to a dynamic tag, populated by backend Java code:

var myString = '@myDynamicContent@';

However, there are some situations, in which the content from the output contains a carriage return; which breaks the code:

var mystring = '<div>
                Carriage Return happened above and below.
                </div>';

Is there anyway I can resolve this problem on the front-end? Or is it too late in the script to do something about it, because the dynamic tag will run before any JavaScript runs (thus the script is broken by that point)?

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2  
Yes, it it is too late. You will need to handle this serverside in your dynamic tag. (Please give us more information about that Java code) –  Bergi Aug 3 '12 at 15:02
1  
@Bergi could you not just strip the carriage returns from myString? For example myString.replace(/[\n\r]/g, ''); –  My Head Hurts Aug 3 '12 at 15:03
    
Here's an idea: If I populate a JS comment /* @myDynamicContent */ - would I be able to read that content with JS? –  brandtrock Aug 3 '12 at 15:04
    
@brandtrock — No. It is a comment. It is for humans, not software. –  Quentin Aug 3 '12 at 15:05
    
@MyHeadHurts — No. There are no new lines in the JavaScript string. There is no JavaScript string. There is a JavaScript syntax error. –  Quentin Aug 3 '12 at 15:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm sure my JS could be cleaned up (just thought this was a fun problem), but you could search out the comment in the JS.

Lets say your JS looks like this (noticed I added a tag to the comment so we know we're going after the correct one, and there is a div to just for testing):

<script id="testScript">
/*<captureMe><div>
  Carriage Return happened above and below.
  </div>
*/
var foo = 'bar';
</script>
<div id='test'>What do I see:</div>

Just use this to grab the comment:

var something = $("#testScript").html();
var newSomething = '';
newSomething = something.substr(something.indexOf("/*<captureMe>")+13);
newSomething = newSomething.substr(0, newSomething.indexOf("*/"));
$('#test').append('<br>'+newSomething);  // just proving we captured the output, will not render returns or newline as expected by HTML

Technically, it works :), scripting-scripting...

Charbs

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I should note: I assumed you could print your dynamic content into a comments field... and that I used some jQuery (kind of goes without saying these days) –  Charbs Aug 3 '12 at 15:51

JavaScript supports strings that can span multiple lines by putting a backslash (\) at the end of the line, for example:

var myString = 'foo\
bar';

So you should be able to do a Java replace when you write in your server-side variable:

var myString = '@myDynamicContent.replaceAll("\\n", "\\\\n")@';
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Replace the \n and/or \r with \\n and/or \\r respectively ... but it has to be done in the server-side language (in your case Java); it can't be done in JavaScript.

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Building off of @Charbs' answer, you could avoid the JavaScript comments if you give your script tag a different mime type, so the browser won't try to evaluate it as JavaScript:

<script id="testScript" type="text/notjs" style="display:none">@myDynamicContent@</script>

And then just grab it like this (using jQuery):

var myString = $('#testScript').text();
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To me it looks like you're doing token replacement instead of using a template engine. If you like token replacement you might Snippetory too, as it creates similar code. However it has a number of additional features. Using

var myString = '{v:myDynamicContent enc="string"}'

would create

var mystring = '<div>\r\n          Carriage Return happened above and below.\r\n                </div>'

And thus solve your problem. But you would have to change your code behind, too.

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