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We are doing TDD for quite a while and we are facing some concerns when we refactor. As we are trying to respect as much as we can the SRP (Single responsibility principle), we created a lot of composition that our classes use to deal with common responsibilities (such as validation, logging, etc..). Let's take a very simple example :

public class Executioner
{
    public ILogger Logger { get; set; }
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        Logger.DoLog("Starting doing something");
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        Logger.DoLog("Something was done!");
    }
}

public interface ILogger
{
    void DoLog(string message);
}

As we use a mocking framework, the kind of test that we would do for this situation would be somthing like

[TestClass]
public class ExecutionerTests
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void Test_DoSomething()
    {
        var objectUnderTests = new Executioner();

        #region Mock setup

        var loggerMock = new Mock<ILogger>(MockBehavior.Strict);
        loggerMock.Setup(l => l.DoLog("Starting doing something"));
        loggerMock.Setup(l => l.DoLog("Something was done!"));

        objectUnderTests.Logger = loggerMock.Object;

        #endregion

        objectUnderTests.DoSomething();

        loggerMock.VerifyAll();
    }
}

As you can see, the test is clearly aware of the method implementation that we are testing. I have to admit that this example is too simple, but we sometimes have compositions that cover responsibilities that don't add any value to a test.

Let's add some complexity to this example

public interface ILogger
{
    void DoLog(LoggingMessage message);
}

public interface IMapper
{
    TTarget DoMap<TSource, TTarget>(TSource source);
}

public class LoggingMessage
{
    public string Message { get; set; }
}

public class Executioner
{
    public ILogger Logger { get; set; }
    public IMapper Mapper { get; set; }
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        DoLog("Starting doing something");

        Thread.Sleep(1000);

        DoLog("Something was done!");
    }

    private void DoLog(string message)
    {
        var startMessage = Mapper.DoMap<string, LoggingMessage>(message);
        Logger.DoLog(startMessage);
    }
}

Ok, this is an example. I would include the Mapper stuff within the implementation of my Logger and keep a DoLog(string message) method in my interface, but it's an example to demonstrate my concerns

The corresponding test leads us to

[TestClass]
public class ExecutionerTests
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void Test_DoSomething()
    {
        var objectUnderTests = new Executioner();

        #region Mock setup

        var loggerMock = new Mock<ILogger>(MockBehavior.Strict);
        var mapperMock = new Mock<IMapper>(MockBehavior.Strict);
        var mockedMessage = new LoggingMessage();

        mapperMock.Setup(m => m.DoMap<string, LoggingMessage>("Starting doing something")).Returns(mockedMessage);
        mapperMock.Setup(m => m.DoMap<string, LoggingMessage>("Something was done!")).Returns(mockedMessage);

        loggerMock.Setup(l => l.DoLog(mockedMessage));

        objectUnderTests.Logger = loggerMock.Object;
        objectUnderTests.Mapper = mapperMock.Object;

        #endregion

        objectUnderTests.DoSomething();

        mapperMock.VerifyAll();
        loggerMock.Verify(l => l.DoLog(mockedMessage), Times.Exactly(2));
        loggerMock.VerifyAll();
    }
}

Wow... imagine that we would use another way to translate our entities, I would have to change every tests that has some method that uses the mapper service.

Anyways, we really feel some pain when we do major refactoring as we need to change a bunch of tests.

I'd love to discuss about this kind of problem. Am I missing something? Are we testing too much stuff?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Tips:

Specify exactly what should happen and no more.

In your fabricated example,

  1. Test E.DoSomething asks Mapper to map string1 and string2 (Stub out Logger - irrelevant)
  2. Test E.DoSomething tells Logger to log mapped strings (Stub/Fake out Mapper to return message1 and message2)

Tell don't ask

Like you've yourself hinted, if this was a real example. I'd expect Logger to handle the translation internally via a hashtable or using a Mapper. So then I'd have a simple test for E.DoSomething

  1. Test E.DoSomething tells Logger to log string1 and string2

The tests for Logger would ensure L.Log asks mapper to translate s1 and log the result

Ask methods complicate tests (ask Mapper to translate s1 and s2. Then pass the return values m1 and m2 to Logger) by coupling the collaborators.

Ignore irrelevant objects

The tradeoff for isolation via testing interactions is that the tests are aware of implementation. The trick is to minimize this (via not creating interfaces/specifying expectations willy-nilly). DRY applies to expectations as well. Minimize the amount of places that an expectation is specified... ideally Once.

Minimize coupling

If there are lots of collaborators, coupling is high which is a bad thing. So you may need to rework your design to see which collaborators don't belong at the same level of abstraction

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Thanks a lot! Nice explanations around coupling and cohesion design issues... I do understand that high coupling is bad, but I don't get why a lot of collaborators is a bad thing. We always need some kind of orchestrator to drive all those collaborations... Thanks for clarifying! –  Jose Jones Aug 6 '12 at 18:42
    
@Jose A large number of collaborators usually is a sign of procedural-style code.. where one central or God object/controller is asking other objects for their internal state and then making their decisions (outside of the object). As a result, the God object is very complex ... making it harder to test. –  Gishu Aug 7 '12 at 6:19
    
Another comment would be that interaction-based tests drive certain traits in the code (like tell don't ask, distributed control, etc.) If you choose to develop code accordingly, the tests are easier. If not the tests are harder to write.. listen to them. –  Gishu Aug 7 '12 at 6:41

Your difficulties come from testing behavior rather than state. If you would rewrite the tests so that you look at what's in the log rather than verifying that the call to the log is made, your tests wouldn't break due to changes in the implementation.

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Thanks for your input Assaf. I'd love to see how you would address it as the implementation of the logger should not be known by the method. So where to look in the log? –  Jose Jones Aug 6 '12 at 18:42
    
That depends on the kind of test I'm doing. For unit tests, I simply wouldn't test it at all. I'd test the component's functionality, and the loggers (if I wrote it), but the usage is strictly integration. For the integrative tests, I'd look at where the log should be. If for example, I'm testing that a function call ends up logged in a file, I'll run it the function, and look in the log file to see if the expected message is there. –  Assaf Stone Aug 6 '12 at 20:01
    
Yeah, we do have what we called Integration tests that do not mock any implementation, so that we can go and validate in the persistancy layer if, for example, a log does exists... –  Jose Jones Aug 7 '12 at 15:51
    
Great. So what you want to do is to exercise the SUT (the system under test), and query the log to search for the expected message. Of course, to make the tests run as fast as possible, I suggest you use an in-memory db such as sqlite. –  Assaf Stone Aug 7 '12 at 17:06

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